360in360

Meet A Presenter: David Wortley

Have you ever wished you could zoom through history with the touch of a button? Or fly to distant lands an be there, surrounded by amazing architecture and breathtaking views? David Wortely’s 360 Broadcast is bringing the world to your fingertips with his immersive video technology.

David is the founder and CEO of 360in360 an Immersive Experience. This venture seeks to use 360 degree video, sound, images, and stories to bring to life interesting places and historic events. These include exploring canals and caravans, visiting breath taking cathedrals, and stepping back in time to experience history first hand.

360in360

Before 360in360, David was the CEO and Founder of GAETSS, a consultancy on the strategic use of Enabling Technologies for the transformation of business and society. In addition, he was the Founding Director of the Serious Games Institute at Coventry University, the first such institute in the world to combine research, education, business incubation, and regional development.

David is also a Vice President of the International Society of Digital Medicine (ISDM) and the Founding President of the European Chapter of ISDM. He is recognized globally on the practical application of emerging and enabling technologies in the areas of health, environment, business development, and education, among others. He is a serial technology innovator and has been a pioneer of emerging technologies for over 30 years.

global learn day

We are so thankful to have David and his amazing technology aboard for Global Learn Day 2018. Looking forward to a unique exploration of the past using state of the art, modern technology.

How about you? Have you ever created a means of gaining a unique perspective on the world? Do you have a passion that you would like to share? There are still a few slots left for this year’s voyage of exploration as we celebrate the history of mankind’s learning once again this autumn.

Maybe you just want to come along for the ride, no reservation required! Sign up to receive our special celebration packet full of activities, planning tools, and interesting ways to join in on this epic, worldwide event. This package is absolutely free!! Our gift for being a loyal passenger on our trusty clipper!

 

 

Live Voom Pitch 360 Broadcast

Live Voom Pitch 360 Broadcast

Posted by David Wortley on Saturday, May 5, 2018

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Meet A Presenter: Silence, On Lit!

Today we meet two special teachers from France who will be presenting their program called, “Silence, on lit!” (Quiet, we’re reading!)

Elise Boirel is a 44 year old mother of two boys aged 14 and 13. She lives in the Paris suburbs. Ms. Boirel has a BA in Marketing, a teaching degree, and a certificate of English proficiency from the University of Cambridge.

Ms. Boirel was a marketing executive who transitioned to becoming an English teacher in 2004. She has been teaching middle school since them. “I love working on projects with other teachers, ” she says, “especially on projects combining English and history

 

Ms. Boirel’s colleague, Karine, is joining her on this project. Karine Riviere is 42 years old, married for 16 years, and the mother of a 15 year old son and 12 year old daughter.

Mrs. Riviere studied history at the Pantheon Sorbonne University in Paris. She also holds a degree in contemporary history and a certificate in geography. She has been the CAPES of history and geography for the past 17 years, and has been at her current school for 13 of those years.

Mrs. Riviere is the principal teacher of the 8 year old class. She has had many exciting opportunities to orchestrate projects with her students. These include a memorial for la paix a Caen with a visit to the deployment beaches in Normandy and the American cemetery at Omaha Beach. Another project included the study of a play by Moliere, the aristocratic gentleman, that included a visit to Vaux le Vicomte. In addition, Mrs. Riviere has studied the history of the American Revolution, the philosophy of the Renaissance and its consequences on the French Revolution with her students.

This year, she launched a campus wide project, “Silence, on lit!” which she eagerly looks forward to presenting for Global Learn Day.

We welcome everyone to teach the world something new. Do you have something to share? Let us know, there are a few slots left!

Welcome aboard Ms. Boirel and Mrs. Riviere, we can’t wait to be your students!

 

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Five Fabulous Youtube Channels for Lifelong Learning

Learning is a journey that never ends and the Internet is a treasure trove of information. So, it is exciting to live in an age of such easy access to information. Youtube has become synonymous with funny cat videos and death defying stunts, however it also packs a mean collection of tutorials, informative videos, and documentaries. One of the true gems on Youtube is the collection of educational channels teaching everything from quantum physics to DIY home improvement.

5 youtube channels you must watch

Here is a list of five channels that will upgrade your entertainment hours into brain building workouts!

Crash Course

Crash Course is  channel offering micro learning bites of deep education. Topics range from science and history to life hacks and “adulting,” and are presented in easy to follow, entertaining videos. There’s even a Crash Course Kids playlist. With over 7 million subscribers, Crash Course is one of the most popular free learning channels on Youtube.

Numberphile

Think you don’t like Math, think again! Perhaps you just haven’t learned from the right teacher. Numberphile teaches complex math concepts in a way that everyone wants to learn. It’s tagline says it all, “Videos about numbers, it’s that simple.” Find out how simple and amazing math can be.

Yousician

Have you always wanted to play the guitar? Yousician offers free, world class guitar lessons that will have you rocking in no time. Yousician teaches both acoustic and electric guitar through the efficient tab system. It is the most popular guitar learning app in 30 countries, so of course it is our favorite, too!

 It’s History!

You know what they say about those who do not learn from history! You need to know history before you can learn from it, though. It’s History takes you on a journey through time to experience up close through the most important, but often unknown bits of history. It’s like your own personal time machine!

 Life Hacks

Not all learning needs to be serious, book learning! Life Hacks is a premier DIY channel that not only teaches you something new but, how to better do what you already know! From crafts and STEM projects to umpteen uses for toothpaste, Life Hacks keeps life interesting. Life Hacks is like the MacGyver of the digital age. (Seriously, check out all the uses for toothpaste!)

What are you watching on Youtube? Have any educational entertainment channels to add? Comment below!

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Education

Education in the Past

Education is Our History

Education is a part of human history since the very first moment.  It has taken on various forms, however education is what has pushed civilizations forward and changed the course of history.

 

The education of young in the ways of survival was not only a tradition, but a necessity.  Every generation passing their knowledge and skills onto the next to ensure the prosperity and continuation of a tribe or family.

 

About three thousand years ago, the written word was born. Hyroglyphics, Cuniform, Sandskrit were among the first languages used to record ideas and knowledge.  The development of writing and reading created a new class of literate people as well as a new job, the scribe.  Across Africa, Asia, and the Middle East, the tide of education was changing thanks to a piece of papyrus and a stylus.

 

As civilization advanced, so did the definition of education, giving way to great thinkers and teachers, such as Socrates.  Socrates is still known as one of the greatest teachers to have ever lived.  Nearly two and a half millennia later, his style of educating is revered and employed by professors.  The dawn of higher education ushered in the value of thought.  No longer was it considered enough to know how to survive, man had learned to thrive.

Formal Education

Over the next thousand years, formal education in schools began to take root as the private study and generational tutelage continued in the home.  In the early middle ages, these cathedral schools led to the development of universities, coming from the Latin for universitas magistrorum et scholarium, a community of teachers and scholars.

 

Thinkers and motivated self-learners, gathered to discuss, ponder, and debate.  Thought and written word collided to birth the greatest learning tool the world has ever known, the book!  While books remained rare for centuries the ability to read became a hallmark of success in elite circles and ruling classes.

 

As the production of books became more readily available, the literacy rates exploded.  Self education came to the masses.  Families read together for entertainment and education.  The art of forming letters in ink was taught by tutors and practiced regularly.  Reading and writing became the building blocks of every education.

 

Literacy rates have continued to climb. “While only 12% of the people in the world could read and write in 1820, today the share has reversed: only 17% of the world population remains illiterate.” (source) The 19th century saw the ability to read become universal in the western world with near 100% literacy rates.

 

The thirst for knowledge and the premium placed on education led to the push for education for all and the advent of public schools.  While the fight for education for all continues, significant progress has been made.  Access to basic school supplies, uniforms, and books being the greatest hurdle for many who desire an education.

The face of education has changed drastically from family lessons of survival to socratic societies, medieval universities, and one room school houses to modern, computerized classrooms. Despite these changes in how we approach teaching, the essence of education is the same.  The goal of every generation must still be passing on vital information, skills, and tools to inspire independent thinking, just as our early ancestors and Socrates did.  Self education, literacy, and the art of writing are just as important now in our digital age as they were in the days of hand copied manuscripts.

 

Educational implements have changed but true and good education never will.  It is the bridge from the past to an ever changing future bolstered by critical thinking, creativity, exploration, depth of knowledge, and quality literature. This is our past, this is our future, and we must never stop until every child has the opportunity to learn and dream.

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In the beginning there was Global Learn Day 1997

Looking Back at an Initial Impression

Access to Education: Global Learn Day

By Terrence R. Redding, Ph.D.

OnLine Training, Inc.

(Note – This was Dr. Redding’s initial reaction to Global Learn Day, almost twenty years ago. The GLD crew felt that it was still relevant today.)

No learning environment is ideal for all potential participants. Some individuals will find they are at a distinct disadvantage in one environment, while in another their disadvantages may disappear. Access for some may be restricted to distance education via the Internet. Online education is viewed by many as second rate (Hibbs, 1998). Why? The instructor and the student do not have face-to-face communications.

A year ago I would have agreed that online education is restricted by the lack of physical proximity. But that was before Global Learn Day 1 (GLD1), my first experience in a distance education online conference. I could hear speakers clearly via streaming RealAudio. I viewed PowerPoint presentation slides directly on my computer screen. I exchanged ideas with other participants and presenters in the Java Chat room. And I posed questions to the presenters through a moderator. In some cases I was also able to see presenters by using streaming video. I came to prefer the online conference over physical attendance. I had a more comfortable seat, could hear and see the content better, and actually had more access to presenters and participants. I missed the social interaction, but I was also not distracted by it. In 30 hours I went around the world hearing from some of the brightest and most innovative distance educators working today, all from the comfort of my home using a computer fresh out of the box with just a dialup connection to the Internet.

Internet technology does not yet convert the sensations of touch and smell to bandwidth, but in many ways Internet technology is far superior for some types of educational forums. I know that courses delivered via the Internet are often devalued as second-rate by traditional faculty and by the public who may view distance education as a poor second choice to attending class on campus. But I believe that within ten years, courses without a distant education (DE) components will be considered second rate.

Distance education via the Internet is not restricted to conferences. The company I am associated with, OnLine Training, Inc. (OLT), delivers educational content exclusively through online technology over the Internet to individuals in need of basic education or continuing professional education. Our students do not conform to the standard notions associated with age, grade, or development. For example, OLT has been developing and marketing a basic adult education program for the General Educational Development (GED) market. Our enrollment profile shows almost equal distribution among US students pursuing a GED, students overseas who need to pass the GED in order to qualify for college in the US, and young students ranging from those with learning disabilities to those who are “gifted”. Some are home schooled; others pursue online courses while attending public or private schools. If you open the door to education, and minimize the gate keeping, it is difficult to predict where the demand will be.

This past month I had an opportunity to speak to a graduate class of Human Resource Development (HRD) students at Florida Atlantic University. As we explored the pros and cons of distance education, I started thinking about some of the GED students with learning disabilities at OLT. One in particular, a young fellow of 15, came to mind. This lad’s speech is difficult to follow, with extended pauses between phrases. My guess is that in a traditional classroom he would not do well. He communicates too slowly to interact effectively with other students. Online he can take as long as he needs to put his thoughts in writing.

Online educational education has fewer barriers and presents wider access to potential student populations than do traditional schools. Students who require special accommodations in a traditional setting (and who therefore may be at a disadvantage) may not be at a disadvantage online. Whether that disadvantage is age, sight, height, mobility, speech, hearing, or whatever, these disadvantages often disappear online.

I am reminded of the commercial for the United Negro College Fund that concludes with the sentiment that “a mind is a terrible thing to waste.” How many minds will be educated at a distance that might not other wise be educated at all? And what of the contributions those minds will make to the human race?

Eight years ago I had a chance to make a presentation at an educational conference that focused on a Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX) that I had conducted for 3,000 children in 21 schools in seven cities in Southwest Oklahoma. I was pretty proud of myself. I had involved a large number of children in a program that ultimately led to a group of students speaking live to the astronauts in the Shuttle as they orbited the earth. The entire exchange was broadcast on educational television.

A NASA scientist followed me. He described the development of a special wheelchair for Stephen Hawkins, a scientist suffering from Lou Gehrigs Disease, who could neither walk nor speak. This wheelchair provided Hawkins with access to the Internet and thus the rest of the world, to include libraries and the ability to write manuscripts and generate artificial speech. Last week I saw a presentation by Hawkins, from his wheel chair, using the artificial speech from the synthesizer in his chair-mounted notebook computer. He described being able to access the various research telescopes of the world via the Internet. His topic was the most recent discoveries by the Hubble Space Telescope and the implications for theoretical astrophysics and mankind’s understanding of the universe.

Eight years ago there were few that considered the implications of the internet as a distance education tool. I was not among them. Today, I still believe my SAREX was a significant contribution in the field of education. However, I believe the Hawkins’ wheelchair to be the more significant contribution because it allowed one of the great minds of our generation access to knowledge and the ability to share his understanding with millions if not billions of his fellow human beings. While I, with my SAREX, touched the minds of a mere 3,000.

I would compare Hawkins’ wheelchair to the internet for the globe, with one note: where the wheelchair was wired for just one man, I would compare the value of the internet to the value of a billion human minds online, to the thought that a single mind is a terrible thing to waste. Access to distance education via the internet will empower potentially billions of human minds.

Formal education requires a firm foundation: a frame of reference, theory, concept, and structure. However, none of these things are static. They, and our understanding of them, change over time. The pace at which they are changing is increasing. The internet is providing a means by which these structures can be discussed and understood on a global scale. Toffler (1970 and 1980) in his two volume set discusses the implications of “Future Shock” and “The Third Wave” for mankind. There are those who are over whelmed by the pace of change; who suffer from Future Shock. And, there are those who appear to thrive on change; who may be the Third Wave. Those on the internet, and especially those educated on the internet may well be Third Wave people. No one can predict the outcome of the advent of the internet as a distance education medium or the potential power it will unleash in mankind as a learning animal. But I believe its impact will be more profound then the advent of the printing press.

Our task as educators is to ensure that as many people as possible have access to the mind-expanding power of the Internet. The date for Global Learn Day 2 (GLD2) is rapidly approaching. It occurs Columbus Day weekend and begins with the rising sun in Guam, and, proceeding for nearly 30 hours around the globe, ends with the setting of the sun in Hawaii. Whether you are interested in distance education for yourself or an organization consider taking the opportunity to experience it first hand during GLD2. I know of no better way to celebrate mankind’s natural continuing conquest of knowledge than to encourage people to celebrate learning through the interconnection of the planet during Global Learn Day.

END.

Today, OLT offers Business Development, Continuing Professional Education and Personal Development Courses both with partner institutions and direct to the student. They do this by partnering with Subject Matter Experts and creating courses in house. If you are interested in a partnership opportunity, contact them!

Consider joining #GLD2017! Contact us to become a Presenter!

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Lifelong Learning - The Quest for More

The Quest for More

The Quest for More

The Library of Alexandria housed an unfathomable amount of knowledge for the ancient world.  When books and resources were rare, this institution boasted the greatest collection of information ever assembled. It was the masterpiece of the Greek civilization led by Alexander’s lifelong quest to explore and conquer by learning all that was known in the world. His thirst for knowledge changed human history!

Knowledge and personal growth have always been prized as an avenue for success.  There is so much to learn, it is a process that could last a lifetime and never be exhausted.  So much more in this modern age of information where masses of data lay right at our fingertips.

 

What is Lifelong Learning?

Lifelong learning is defined as “the ‘ongoing, voluntary, and self-motivated’ pursuit of knowledge for either personal or professional reasons. Therefore, it not only enhances social inclusion, active citizenship, and personal development, but also self-sustainability, as well as competitiveness and employability”

 

Learning is not confined to a school building, textbooks, or a certain number of years of life.  It is a process that stretches beyond place, time, and method. As the sayings go, “ignorance is bliss,” however, “knowledge is power!”

Extended learning is not only enriching for your life, but your mind.  An open mind is fertile ground for innovation.  The more you are exposed to new information and ideas, the more you will understand the world around you and evaluate your beliefs.

It’s not just your mind that might change, learning actually changes the physical makeup of your brain.  Just as exercise is beneficial and necessary for our muscles, bones and overall health, learning flexes and optimizes our brain.  A healthy brain is important, it is the powerhouse for your entire body.

 

Reasons To Be a Lifelong Learner:

  • Employability is one of the greatest motivators to continue studying. Learning new skills, earning a degree, delving deeper into your chosen field all make for more successful careers and higher pay.  In a word, it creates wealth. Learning also increases motivation.  Lifelong learners are self-starters and prosper in any economy.
  • Personal enrichment through learning makes for an interesting and active life no matter your age. Learning how to knit, play the piano, or do tae kwon do expand social opportunities.  Delving into a favorite subject such as the age of exploration allows your brain to get exercise which is just as important as exercise for your body.
  • Learning about another culture or how to speak another language opens doors in both your personal and professional life. As our world “shrinks” with globalization and the interconnectivity of the digital age, a second or third language is more important, not less.  Also, language learning develops the brain in amazing ways.
  • The self-sufficient lifestyle has gained popularity in recent years as people realize how many skills have been lost or forgotten and want to be able to do for themselves. Self-sufficiency requires knowledge and action.  While reading about gardening or woodworking is still good, both require hands on experience to master.  The practice of learned knowledge leads to deeper understanding, analysis, and ultimately new ideas and a deeper desire to learn more.  Pick up a skill when you don’t want to pick up a book.
  • Well informed citizens are better able to make good decisions, problem solve, choose representatives, and build sustainable communities. Learning about politics, government, laws, and local needs is the best way to serve your neighbors and country.

 

Are you motivated to start learning, again?  School may be out, but learning should never end.  Turn on an audiobook, crack open a novel, read the newspaper, sit down with a neighbor to knit, whatever you do, just exercise your gray matter. This is what Builds the Future. What do you want to learn today?

 

 

 

 

 

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