Meet Our Presenters: Mary’s Meals

Do you want to save the world? Feeling like there is too much to be done and you are too small to make a difference?

 

If you can’t feed a hundred people, just feed one

Mother Teresa

That is the quote and simple premise that inspired a huge charity making immense strides in the battle against poverty and starvation.

Magnus MacFarlane-Barrow began Mary’s Meals with the dream of giving just one child a good meal once a day at a school. His charity now feeds 1,257,278 children around the world every single day.

More than just a small hand out, the meals provided are packed with the nutrition that they hungriest children desperately need. Moreover, with food being provided at school, these children are receiving a life changing education with a side of life saving nourishment.

Food + School = HOPE

Inspired by his deep faith and full of young zeal, Magnus and his brother began collecting donations in the mid-1980’s to aid those suffering from the Bosnian War. What started as a summer project, soon grew into a full time career and a large charity named SRI.

When the war ended, Magnus looked for where he could help next. This led him to Malawi in 2002 where a great famine raged. There, Magnus met Edward who shared his biggest hope with Magnus.

“I want to have enough food to eat and to go to school one day.”

That was the birth of Magnus’ lifelong mission. That year, Mary’s Meals fed 200 children in Malawi. The Mary’s Meals program now operates in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and South America, as well as running a home for young people with HIV in Romania who were abandoned as children.

The beauty of this simple idea goes beyond the meal at school, though. Ingredients are sourced locally, contributing to the local economy. Local volunteers and employees are used to cook, serve, and guard the meals, creating an empowerment unlike traditional food drop programs.

 

one dime can save the world

The most spectacular feature of Mary’s Meals, though, is the cost. Each meal costs only 10 cents, meaning a child can receive an entire year’s worth of meals for only $19.50! In an effort to feed as many children as possible, at least 93% of all donations go directly toward the providing of meals, not organization overhead.

We are grateful to have Mary’s Meals International as a returning presenter, and inspired by the work it does to provide continued access to education.

Do you know a charity breaking down barriers to education? We would love to know more about it.

Global Learn Day 2018 is just four months away. Are you ready? We are working hard to make this the best Global Learn Day, ever, but we need your help!

We are still seeking presenters and partners, but also participants like you who are our greatest asset.

If you would like to learn more about becoming a part of the Global Learn Day team, please check out our Partners and Presenters page or drop a comment below! We will be sure to get in touch with you, soon.

How to get involved with Global Learn Day 2018

How can you unite the world through education?

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Did curiosity kill the cat?

The Curious Case for Curiosity

The old saying that “curiosity killed the cat” has been used as a cautionary tale for generations. The take away being, go with the flow and follow the rules if you want to survive. In an age that prizes digital data and measurable outcomes, curiosity seems to be an enigma relegated to mad scientists and those prone to daydreaming. However, curiosity is essential to true education.

What makes an education true?

Is it the ranking of grades and scores, the completion of levels and requirements, or the meeting of standards and accomplishments? Actually none of the above are education. Each is a way to measure a finite amount of learning in a prescribed program, they are the framework for justifying the completion of a degree or attainment of an award–in a word, school. School may be where an education begins, but it is never where it ends.

The goal of a true education is not just to impart facts but to ignite the spark of learning that builds a habit of lifelong learning in the ever growing passion to know and understand more. This is why true education begins and ends with curiosity, because curiosity is infinite in nature.

What Does Curiosity in Action Look Like?

The Wright brothers are the picture of ingenuity and achievement.  When they finally made their successful flight, a friend remarked to Orville that he and his brother would go on to be shining examples of what can be achieved even without and special advantages. Orville reproofed his friend by responding, “to say we had no special advantages … the greatest thing in our favor was growing up in a family where there was always much encouragement to intellectual curiosity.”

The encouragement of curiosity, especially in the realm of intellectual pursuits, must be the first aim of all education because curiosity not only prepares the brain for learning, but makes all subsequent learning more enjoyable. Enjoyable learning leads to a lifelong love of learning something new which is not only good for the brain but essential to a successful career, especially in the 21st Century.

How Do We Encourage Curiosity in Education

The encouragement of curiosity must always be accomplished apart from assessment. This is more difficult in our current educational system, but not impossible. Giving students, and ourselves, freedom to be bored and also to potentially fail opens to door to a curiosity driven endeavor.

Here are some practical ways that curiosity can be encouraged in the classroom, homeschool, or personal learning environment:

  1. Allot unstructured time with no expectation of what gets completed
  2. Create a makers space with a wide array of materials and no instructions
  3. Allow the pursuit of personal interests
  4. Practice self-directed education
  5. Use open ended projects
  6. Try something new, turn a routine on it’s head
  7. Explore the world of cultures, foods, traditions, and societies
  8. Encourage questions to be asked
  9. Question the answers

 

Are you a curious learner? How do you encourage curiosity in your home or classroom?

*Please join the discussion in our Friends of Global Learn Day Facebook Group!

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Permission to Fail

Want to succeed?  Learn to fail!

In a competitive and driven world, failure is not accepted.  Those at the top are expected to be the best always and rank of scores is highly prized.  Education becomes a competitive sport, something to be conquered instead of enjoyed.

Making the Grade

Grades are a perceived reward for the job of learning.  As our focus on education, in modern times, has become more and more centered upon formal schooling, grades have gained importance as an indicator of what was achieved by a student or an entire school.

We equate high grades or marks with success and learning.  However, the two are very different entities. High grades may reflect a level of success, albeit they do not measure true learning. Just because the answer was correct does not mean the student actually learned.

By putting more emphasis on grades, GPAs, and standardized scores, we are creating a climate where failure of any kind is unacceptable. Success, completion, and perfection are prizes above the process of development. This degrades the value of education provided through school by seeing it as a means to an end instead of a process and experience.

Learning to Fail VS Failing to Learn

If the sole goal of an education is the right answer, how much is really learned? Every great discovery and invention has been the product of a long series of attempts, failures, questions, and reattempts.

In an anecdote relayed by Thomas A. Edison’s assistant, we can see the journey of failure needed to succeed:

I found him at a bench about three feet wide and twelve to fifteen feet long, on which there were hundreds of little test cells that had been made up by his corps of chemists and experimenters. He was seated at this bench testing, figuring, and planning. I then learned that he had thus made over nine thousand experiments in trying to devise this new type of storage battery, but had not produced a single thing that promised to solve the question. In view of this immense amount of thought and labor, my sympathy got the better of my judgment, and I said: ‘Isn’t it a shame that with the tremendous amount of work you have done you haven’t been able to get any results?’ Edison turned on me like a flash, and with a smile replied: ‘Results! Why, man, I have gotten a lot of results! I know several thousand things that won’t work.’

Edward Burger, a math professor at Williams College, has a unique approach to not only calculating grades but inspiring failure.  He requires his students to fail in order to further discussion and discovery within his class. In fact, in order to earn an A, the highest bar of success gradewise, students must learn to fail. Five percent (5%) of the final grade is based on how well students fail.

The failure in Professor Burger’s class propels students to take risks, it inspires them to ask questions and get involved with discussion even when they may not be 100% sure that they have the correct answer. The freedom to fail, gives them wings to soar. At the end of the semester, each student is required to write an essay on their failure experience and grade themselves on how well it went and what was learned.  In this way, Professor Burger is igniting the flame to continue to learn and promoting true and lasting education.

If at First You Don’t Succeed

In nurturing education for our children, community, and self, we must never put perfection and results above the process.  Learning that is authentic and meaningful cannot simply be assigned a right or wrong answer, nor is it a linear, clear-cut experience.

Giving students permission to fail, frees them from the constrains of having to perform and lets them develop innovative and creative ways to solve a problem. Even when the “wrong” answer is reached, there is great value in the step taken to get there that will feed deeper understanding and greater appreciation for the subject. In an innovation and technology driven world, failure is the key to creative success.

To become a lifelong learner, one must be willing to try and fail. As was mentioned in Burger’s essay, if you get onto a bicycle and never fall, you have learned nothing.  Like a small child who toddles and falls, we must trudge on realizing that education is not a linear race, but a sorted journey or twists, turns, and set backs. It isn’t in the success that education and innovation are gained, but in the grueling process of figuring out how to get from A to B and starting over when plan A, B, C, D, and even F backfire.

How have you failed to learn or learned to fail?

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light

Electric Education Part 2

Electricity is a blessing to education, as we explored earlier in the week.  Now let’s look at innovative ways that electricity is coming to remote places and building bridges to the future.

Innovative Supplies of Electricity

Bundles of Energy

Have you ever watched children play? They run, they jump, they seem to just never stop.  More than once each of us has joked about harnessing their energy to power a small city.  What if I told you the joke is now a reality.

Jump to It

When on a trip to visit family in Nigeria, Jessica O Matthews, founder of Uncharted Play(now Uncharted Power), struggled with the fumes from a diesel generator used to power the lights for her aunt’s wedding celebration.  Determined to find a way to solve the problem of energy sources in developing nations, Matthews got her chance in college and not only built a high scoring project with a few of her classmates for her engineering class, but founded a company.

Their first product SOCCKET is a soccer ball that is actually a generator.  It provided 2 hours of power for a lamp used by students to study in areas without electricity. Then there is PULSE a jump rope that can charge a cell phone to half power after just 15 minutes of use. Play become power.

Uncharted Power’s mission is to reach areas most in need of electricity with clean, easy to use generator options.

Shine Some Light on the Situation

Groups like Solar City are bringing brightness to developing areas of the world, including Mali Malawi, Nicaragua, and Haiti, through donating solar panels.  The solar panels are attached to school roofs or mounted on the ground. They power simple LED lights and include a battery back-up feature.

These panels allow for better access to education for children and parents, spreading not only light but hope.  A school in Nigeria that received the panels now functions as a community center at night.

Not only are the panels usable in areas that would never see on the grid electric, they are cost effective and clean–creating no harmful fumes.

Gravity Works

The GravityLight  uses a simple pulley system and sand bag to provide off the grid power anywhere.  Available for use as emergency lighting in the USA, Deciwatt Ltd funds donations of the GravityLight to those who need it most around the world.

The system provides clean energy that is much safer than kersene lamps, traditionally used in developing nations, and costs only $5! Aside from the dangerous fumes that cause health problems and make homes prone to disaster by fire; kerosene also consumes a large percentage of a developing world family’s budget–as much as 30%.

By using a clean, renewable, and safe source of light, children have more time to study and parents have more resources to provide for their family. Both help to break the cycle of poverty.

What’s Next?

With the advancements in solar and kinetic power generation, the hope of spreading light across the globe is closer than ever.  After all, who doesn’t want a magic machine to wash their clothes?

 

Electricity is only the beginning. By providing access to lighting, schools become open to adding technology. Currently, mobile phone usage is growing in developing nations more than anywhere else on the planet.

Mobile phones build bridges through providing communication to the most remote parts of the globe.  Phones are also used to increase literacy by providing incentive to learn to write and spell through texting and download information from the Internet.

No longer are remote school relegated to out of date textbooks.  Simple phones can open an entirely new world of information and learning.

It is important to not just jump on the bandwagon of technology donation, though, without the proper infrastructure and education, this technology is rendered useless. Program which can build, teach, and provide technology programs to underserved schools can be the key to bridging the gap in education worldwide.

As one school rises, so does an entire town, area, region, country, and generation.  Little by little, light by light, we can see a future where every child get to learn and poverty is extinguished.

How would you help a school in need?

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The Skills Gap and Real Education

There is a debate going on that is not easily settled. Does the skills gap exist? If it does, why? How do we close it?

Opponents blame the recession for high unemployment rates and say there is no skills gap, just no jobs. On the other hand, analysts, journalists, business executives, and employment specialists say the gap is real and it is growing.  Which side is correct?

 

The Gap or Not The Gap, That’s Not The Question

Regardless of the actual gap, the answer to all of the questions is education.  Real education, not just the years spent in a school.  Education is a bridge to a brighter future for everyone.  It should not be limited to check lists and basic requirements.  Wherever you are on the learning continuum, there is always more to learn.

This is why at Global Learn Day, we emphasize and promote lifelong learning and endless, self education.  How can these principles solve the skills gap? Let’s explore three reasons.

Adult Education and Essential Skills

Basic skills like reading, writing, and computation are foundational to the educational process.  Yet, millions of prospective employees lack these cornerstone, building blocks.  In the United States alone, 36 million adults of working age are not proficient in language usage, fluent reading, and everyday math.

Without these skills, not only will the search for employment be difficult, but acquiring new skills is nearly impossible. A base of knowledge must be laid in order to build a lifetime of learning.  This is a skills gap that plagues every corner of the world.  In countries with mandatory, universal education, it should be a wake up call that our methods must change in order to reach and teach every student.

Adult education does not address the cause of this gap, but effectively treats the symptoms of it.  Investing in adult education creates a ripple effect that allows for better opportunities for the adult learner, as well as greater hope for future generations. Low income children who have at least one parent who has earned a G.E.D, are more likely to finish high school themselves.

Education begets education. Learning inspires more learning. By building up one segment of the population that is underserved and underskilled, the entire society is boosted and inspired to work harder.  So, providing adult education to close the basic skills gap will help ensure that gap continues to lessen in the future generations.

Continuing Education in Corporate Culture

Gone are the days of learning a finite skills set, earning a degree or diploma, and finding a lifelong career in one organization. The information age has ushered in a wave of advancing technology that continues to evolve and develop. What was top last year or even last month has now been replaced by a new software or operating system.

Basic education and higher education are still so vitally important, but in order for workers and employers to compete in this brave new world, continuing education must be a central tenet of how they do business.

Corporate learning retreat, incentives for continuing education classes, and encouragement for passive learning among employees are the hallmarks of what will not only close the skills gap in growing fields but also keep companies afloat in these volatile economic waters.

Continuing education is not just a buzz word, nor a race to a higher salary, for every employee it must be a way of life.

The Ben Franklin Way–Self Education

In locations where education is mandatory and universal, there is a tendency to equate education with school. However, these are two very different concepts.  Schools may be where you get educated, however an education is not exclusive to school.

Like the rest of the world, schools are struggling to keep up with the pace of the digital age.  Even the best schools are not adequate in providing all of the skills a person would need by the time he enters the workforce or looks to advance his career. This is because the skills that will be needed at that time are for platforms that do not exist today.

The push to include subjects like coding in school is part of a movement to prepare students for a future that we cannot even imagine right now. However, even these efforts will not insulate the next generation from a skills gap of their own.

Self education is the answer to the skills crisis. It has always been the answer. No matter what education you are lacking, individual study and pursuit of knowledge is what propels the motivated forward.

Like our patron, Benjamin Franklin, Global Learn Day recognizes and celebrates the on going efforts of self education.  In an age where skills are demanded but not being formally taught, adopting a habit of independent study apart for certificates, degrees, or pay incentives to be earned will provide much greater opportunity than any corporate education structure or formal education.

The skill to self educate is the the greatest skill to acquire. Those able to stay ahead of the curve, learn new technologies, and be flexible in how common procedures are done will be the ones to achieve and succeed.

How will you close your own skills gap today?

For more information on where to continue your own education, check out these posts:
Education: The Gift You Give Yourself
The Fun of Self Education
When Should Education End?
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New Years Resolution Goals

Ring in the New Year by the Ringing of the School Bell

Resolve to Learn

The year is rapidly coming to a close, with it a flurry of activity and holidays are being celebrated worldwide.  This is a time of excitement and joy. It is also a time for introspection and goal setting.

Come December 31st, millions and millions will create resolutions with the intent of improving themselves and their lives in the coming new year.  Among the top resolutions are losing weight, exercising, quitting bad habits, and finding a job.

What if this year, you resolve to learn something new?  Learning exercises your brain, creates balance in your life, leads to better decision making capabilities, and could help you land that job or improve your chances of promotion at your current employment.

Surfing the Web to Learn

Continuing education is more readily available than ever, delivered directly to your laptop, tablet, or phone. Here are some resources to jump start your lifelong learning habit.

Udemy Like shopping on Black Friday for all the deals? Then this learning platform is for you!  Forget the latest craze, sign up for a class! Udemy has a Black Friday special going on right now with courses costing only $10!!  There is so much to learn, and with this deal, you could chose to learn more for less.

SkillshareSkillshare offers short courses on specific skill sets from photography to e-commerce, this website has opportunity to grow in your career and hobbies. The lack of long term commitment for classes makes this an ideal place to start.

Open Course WareVirtually every major university offers open courses online for the public to take at will.  These courses are free and are the same courses offered at the university itself. While you cannot earn a degree through these courses, you will still learn from top notch professors. In addition, you could test drive a program or major.  Lastly, you can use the courses to prep yourself for CLEP examination which can earn you college credit.

KHAN AcademyFree video based courses for kindergarten through adult education. KHAN Academy covers diverse subjects with an intense focus on science, math, and computer programming.

YoutubeAside from the funny videos and viral pranks, Youtube offers an immense amount of knowledge for free.  There are videos on every subject and many skills to be learned in a “one-on-one” setting.  Decide what you would like to know how to do in the new year and find an appropriate Youtube channel. You may have to dig around to find the presenter who works best for you, but don’t worry there are 300,000 new videos loaded every day!

Looking for more online opportunities?  Check out this list of 20 Places to Educate Yourself For Free! You are sure to find something to tickle your fancy and expand your mind!

Offline Learning

Online learning, elearning, and virtual coursework are all the rage right now. The Internet does surely provide unsurpassed access to information and is a flexible tool allowing educational opportunities to reach where traditional schools never could. However, online classes are not the only means of continuing education in the 21st century.

If online classes just aren’t your thing or your bandwidth doesn’t accommodate videos, learn the old fashioned way-through books and other people. Books are still just as valuable as they were pre-Internet days.  Find a good book on whatever you are yearning to master. Don’t have a skill you need to learn? How about you just read some good classic literature?  Your brain will get pumping and you will surely expand your vocabulary. All around, a worth while endeavor!

In addition to amazing books, see what learning opportunities exist in your area. Is there a club offering demonstrations? Could you sit in on a course offered at your local trade school or college to learn more about the study program?  Libraries offer a vast array of programs, course, and groups that can enrich your lifelong pursuit of knowledge, oh and they also have books–many, many books!

How will you resolve to learn this coming year?

 

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Learning Beyond the Books

Education matters.  It changes lives and ultimately changes the world.  Global Learn Day is committed to promoting education and inspiring learning. However, we often only think of education as book learning, focusing on the core school subjects.  This however is a narrow view of how we must educate our child and ourselves.

Life Skills Matter, Too

Life skills are essential to every human being.  They are the learning that is often passed on through families and tradition.  These hands on lessons are so very important and no less worthy of time than quantum physics.

STEM lessons may be what creates the next big invention, but life skill learning is what keeping the world going.

What Are Life Skills?

Life skills are those abilities that are needed to live a productive life. They are often not quantitative achievements and so are often overlooked in the modern push for rank and reward. However, mastery of life skills will not only make living in the world as an independent adult possible but will also enhance your employability, despite not being featured on your transcript.

Some examples of life skills are:

  • cooking
  • basic repairs
  • personal care
  • planning
  • public speaking
  • time management
  • stress management
  • self awareness
  • note taking
  • problem solving
  • ingenuity
  • conflict resolution
  • negotiation
  • nutrition and meal preparation
  • budgeting
  • bookkeeping
  • house keeping
  • gardening

These are just a sampling of knowledge that enhances your life and gives you an edge in the work force.  While some of these may seem obsolete in the digital age, being self-sufficient leads to a better understanding of the world around you and the ability to navigate pitfalls more easily. In addition, working with your hands lends itself to innovation by fueling creativity.

The Mother of All Invention

We have all heard the phrase that “Necessity is the mother of all invention.” This is mostly true and need most definitely inspires new answers to problems. However, another, often ignored, skill goes hand in hand with invention. It is making do.

In the progressive and prosperous western culture, this skill is rapidly being lost.  The illusion of unlimited resources leads many to consume continually instead of conserve.

Making do involves using what you have to get what you need.  It is a side effect of becoming self reliant.  Life skills lend themselves to creating individuals who are more resilient and capable to care for themselves. As One Planet, One People, these skills are not only a boon to our own future, but a gift to the world around us. Consuming less and understanding more aids the life of everyone around the world.

Another R to Learn

With the race to become the best in STEM and technology, we must not forget the less flashy learning that is essential to our survival as a civilization and a global community. Self-Reliance and self-sufficiency skills need to be taught along with the 3 R’s and STEM to create whole, productive, adults for the future–a future of peace and prosperity for all.

Families, schools, and communities must to find ways to pass on these abilities to build creative and competent citizens of tomorrow.

How can you pass on life skill wisdom?

 

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Empty Classroom

What Education is Not

 

The news and the talk around the watercooler are often centered on “the state of education,” “reform in education,” and “needing a good education.”  However, what is education?  Is it just school?  Is it a degree or certificate?  Do grades determine education or is it curriculum?  Is education solely what happens under direction or is it self motivated?

 

Education is defined as:

  1. The act or process of educating or being educated.
  2. The knowledge or skill obtained or developed by a learning process.
  3. A program of instruction of a specified kind or level: driver education; a college education.
  4. The field of study that is concerned with the pedagogy of teaching and learning.
  5. An instructive or enlightening experience: Her work in an animal shelter was a real education.

 

Now that we know what it is, let’s look at what it isn’t.  Education is not teaching, it is learning. We often confuse the two.  We use educating and teaching interchangeably. However, they are two different ideas and processes.

 

Teaching is imparting your own knowledge to another and requiring some demonstration of understanding to conclude the lesson.  The student produces a reply to his teacher’s lesson.  This reply is then evaluated and the student is deemed successful or not.

 

On the other hand, educating is the process of learning, the method of understanding, and the obtaining of knowledge.  In this way, the educating is done by the student as she learns, not by the teacher as he teaches.

 

In pursuit of a quantitative means to evaluate the level of education of every student, assessments are devised.  However, assessment is not education, either.  While they will rank students based on their ability to reproduce the given information, it is impossible to evaluate the qualitative. It is in the quality of a student’s use and synthesis of facts that education occurs.  These could take months, years, or a lifetime.  There is no way of putting it onto a timeline.

 

Education is enlightening, the spark of an idea should be triggered in the brain. An idea leads to more study, deeper learning, a hypothesis, testing, and conclusion.  At times this enlightenment come naturally through a sudden understanding of past life experience colliding with the presentation current information.  Other times it is a tedious unfolding, as layer upon layer of instruction and study build the foundation until the true enlightenment of learning is reached.

 

Education is not a collection of grade levels. It is not a building or designated area. It should know no time nor space.  Education is not a list of rules, a checklist of assignments, a test booklet of bubbles to fill, or a syllabus of study.

 

It cannot be measured by paper degrees, resumes, or ranking percentiles.  Education is a matter of the heart, brain, and psyche.  Always a personal matter, not a pedagogy.  It knows no limits and accepts no boundaries.  To be educated is not to know what the “right” answer is or what to think on particular topic. No, true education is the ability to think, to reason, to make conclusion and decide your own point of view, but be willing to delve deeper to ensure you are correct in that view.

 

When we limit education to a time or place or method or material or outcome, we limit the capabilities of an infinitely capable mind. We turn humans into computing machines.  Take data in, spit data out.  Algorithms are applied, but not higher level thinking.  Outcomes are achieved, but material is rapidly forgotten.

 

Education is a process that never ends. Just as each child learns to walk and talk, learns about hot and cold, learns the wetness of rain and the brilliance of sun; so, too, we must all learn about our world through a process of personal discovery. Providing education to the world cannot stop at supplying books or school supplies, it must continue in the pursuit of dispensing the tools and enticement to grow not only in factual knowledge but a wealth of understanding.

 

What is education?  It is what it means to be truly human and fully free!

 

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The Summer Slide

Recently, I attended a meeting that spoke about “The Summer Slide”. This is a situation where students lose skills as a result of having the summer off.  After eight or nine months in school, students take a few months off and typically go to summer camps, on vacations or just spend time in their community. It’s a well-deserved break, right? After all, we would not want to push kids too much, would we? What if kids could enjoy their summer and not lose skills? In the US, programs are being created to help.

It was while learning morning about the Summer Slide that I found this article. In it, we can read about year round learning (an interesting idea) AND “National Summer Learning Day”. This is a great program that brings awareness to the Summer Slide and encourages communities, families and elected officials to engage students during the summer months. This year it is July 13th and you can learn about it here.

In addition to checking out the National Summer Learning Association, there are additional options for families to encourage their kids during the summer and avoid the Summer Slide. Parents can enroll their children in the Kahn Academy a nonprofit that has a wealth of information available to students. Parents are able to monitor student’s progress through subjects by grade level. Videos and exercises are both available and at no cost. This is definitely a program that is building a better future!

At home, with my children, we set reading goals at the beginning of the summer. We also work to brush up and get stronger on subjects that the kids had a tough time with the previous school year. This year, it is Math. We will buy books, definitely use the Kahn Academy and drill. Usborne Books have amazing keys that kids can use on the go (a low tech solution that is fun)! As a parent, it is my responsibility to help my kids fight the Summer Slide.

 

BUT…

 

What happens when we finish our school days? What is the equivalent to the Summer Slide for adults? And… if there is one, how do we fight it? The answer should be that we never stop learning, we never stop picking up new skills.

Global Learn Day celebrates mankind’s learning. We appreciate and respect those who innovate education and help spread it to all corners of our planet. In order to truly be, One Planet, One People, we must educate. We must spread our knowledge to all corners of the planet. As a people, as mankind, we can all fall into the Summer Slide when we stop learning and growing our knowledge base.

So now, we can choose to fight that slide. Let’s join together in Building a Better Future by spreading our knowledge around the globe. Celebrate Global Learn Day with us!

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