Mary's Meals

Mary’s Meals

A Nickel’s Worth

What can you do with a nickel?  Could you change the future?  Could you build bridges?  Could you save lives and fuel dreams? You can if that nickel finds its way to a Mary’s Meals collection campaign.

 

Founded on the principle that food+school=hope, Mary’s Meals feeds over a million children each day and has revolutionized the war on hunger.  The concept is so easy, anyone, including young children, can make a difference.

 

How Mary’s Meals Works

In 2002, Magnus MacFarlane-Barrow, founder of Mary’s Meals, was on a service trip to Malawi.  There he met a young boy named Edward.  Edward’s one life wish was to have enough to eat and go to school. Out of this request, the idea of Mary’s Meals was born.

 

Inspired by the words of Mother Teresa, “If you can’t feed one hundred children, just feed one.” Magnus set out to feed children one good meal a day at a place of education, thus feeding their bodies and minds.  Soon he was feeding 200 children a day in Malawi with 93% of all donations going directly to feeding children.

 

The simple porridge, Likuni Phala, is served in large plastic mugs to the children each day. The mugs are so prized that many children wear them on strings hung around their necks so as not to lose them.  This simple blend of ingredients is prepared in a dedicated kitchen built at the school by Mary’s Meals

 

All of the kitchens are staffed by local volunteers and supplied with local goods to create a simple, but highly nutritious porridge for the students of the school where the kitchen is housed. Using local sources keeps the cost of feeding down while investing in the community.  By coming to school, the children receive life saving food, and a life altering education.

 

The Little School with Big Dreams

In 2014, a small, Catholic school in New York embarked on a mission to build a Mary’s Meals kitchen in Malawi.  Inspired by the movie Child 31, the students held nickel drives and fundraisers.  In just four months, they raised the $11,500 to build a kitchen at Dzungwi school, Malawi but it didn’t stop there.

 

Mary’s Meals became such a part of the school’s culture that a Mary’s Meals club was born.

Throughout the year, the children meet dressed in their signature blue Mary’s Meals shirts to sort and count the money raised each month to feed keep the kitchen running.  As part of the club, students learn more about their sister school in Malawi, exchange letters, videos, and photos; and even learn to play the same games that entertain their faraway friends.

 

Last year, St. Stephen St Edwards School raised over $20,000 by collecting deposit cans and bottles, holding nickel drives, selling popcorn each Wednesday, selling giftware, and more.  Through their efforts, a second kitchen was adopted in Liberia that is now fully funded by the club.

Building Bridges One Nickel at a Time

The Mary’s Meals Club has built a bridge for children in a semi-rural town to learn and grow.  Their worldview has expanded, and their connection to others on the opposite side of the world has solidified.  The efforts of serving and understanding have benefited the children in the club as well as those they fundraise to feed. Likewise, the simple meals that are being provided in two countries thanks to this club are building bridges to the bright futures for the recipient children.

 

This is what One Planet, One People is all about.  Journeying together in hope and knowledge to a promising future.  Building a bridge isn’t hard.  Just start one brick at a time, one child at a time.  Inspiring youth to serve others and support global education is one of the greatest lessons we can offer.

 

St Stephen-St Edward school has not just found a hobby, it has discovered its mission.  It is currently one of the largest and longest running fundraising campaigns for Mary’s Meals in the world.  It all started with a simple idea, let’s help bring hope to a child in need.

 

How are you spreading the light of education to the world?  Be the spark that chases the dark. Help those most in need and build a bridge to a better world!

The Joy of Self Directed Learning

The Fun of Self Education

Why Self Educate?

Everyone knows that continuing education is an important part of most careers today. However, it is also an important habit for life.  Continuing education does not need to be obligatory courses or seminars, it is simply the practice of lifelong learning.  Teaching children to be self educators is as simple as allowing them the freedom to self direct their study.  This is particularly ideal for homeschooling. It can be the difference between just getting the curriculum finished and falling in love with learning.

 

How Does This Fit into My Homeschool?

Self directed learning is not the same as unschooling, although it can be.  If you speak to any veteran homeschool educator, you will invariably hear that the main goal in homeschooling is to raise children who educate themselves.  While this still requires support and guidance from the parents, it does not entail the parent being in charge of every piece of information learned by the student.

 

This technique not only nurtures continued education but is enjoyable for the student. Do you have a favorite time period of history?  How about an animal that amazes you?  Have you ever wished you could do a particular skill or craft?  All of these and more can be accomplished through self education.  So push away the textbooks, clear some time in the schedule, and let your children explore their learning passions.

 

How Do I Promote Self Directed Learning?

There are many ways this can be accomplished.  The easiest is to schedule time where your children explore their interests in depth.  Doing so can include reading, watching how-to videos, taking field trips, experimenting, doing hands on activities, or listening to podcasts.  This time is an active learning period but is also passive as there are no checklists or assignments required to be completed.  Don’t have time every day? Not a problem.  Find time once a week or even once a month if need be, the down time will refresh their enthusiasm and fuel their imagination.

 

To truly embrace the gift of self directed education, have your child make curriculum decisions with you.  Perhaps allow him to choose his history study.  Together design an elective class. Your child could even choose the theme of her studies for the year.  The possibilities are endless.  One of the great beauties of homeschooling is the flexibility and freedom that comes with this style of education.  No one is bound by a simple course manual, or rigid schedule. Schedules and curriculum plans are important but not the hallmarks of homeschools.

 

If the thought of designing a course is overwhelming or you don’t know where to begin, there are also journals like Thinking Tree books that provide a guided approach to self education. Each journal has a theme and the student follows the guidelines of the journal, choosing his own books to study. These can be used as a supplement or a course in themselves.  There are also several blogs and Facebook pages dedicated to the idea of “Funschooling” which can help you design an entire curriculum around self directed study.

 

What if My Child Doesn’t Have an Interest to Pursue?

So you have provided the time, space, and support for your child to plunge ahead on this self education adventure, but he just doesn’t know what to study.  What to do now?  Is all hope lost? Never! There is always time to learn something new. Here are a few times to encourage your child to want to self educate.

  1. Read a wide array of literature and nonfiction books as read alouds and see which spark an interest.  It may take awhile, but something is bound to peak her curiosity and leave them with questions she wants answered.
  2. Take varied field trips (including virtual ones) to learn more about history, science, and geography. Allow the experience to intrigue your child to learn more.
  3. Have a reading week where you have no lesson plans other than reading as a family and individually.  Do not set any timers or make any required reading lists.  Reading is the first and more important components to self education.
  4. Let your child get bored!  Necessity may be the mother of invention but boredom is the father of ingenuity.  Once true boredom sets in she will need to find a way to counteract it.  This is where interest, ideas, and experimentation take off.

 

What if We Are Not Homeschoolers?

Self directed learning is by far easier in a homeschool but it is not exclusive to the homeschool life. Anyone can and should promote this practice.  Follow the suggestions above and find time, perhaps on a weekend afternoon or over a school break to give your children, and yourself, room to explore and learn. Discovering how to fit such activities into a busy schedule is a skill that will serve everyone well for a lifetime because learning should never end no matter how full our plate becomes.

 

Freedom to dive into a body of knowledge or conquer a manual skill builds self confidence and self reliance. Let your child steer the ship for a little while and see what shores you discover!

 

How do you promote self directed study in your home?

MeetOurTeam

Get to Know – Jennifer

Recently, one of our GLD crew created her introduction video. For those who would prefer to read it, you may continue below!

 

Hi I’m Jennifer Elia! I’m from New Jersey and this is my first Global Learn Day and I’m so excited to be a part of this team! When I was a child I loved to read. I mean, I still do but I would read anything that was put in front of me. In fact, I would read the same cereal box every morning just because it was words and it was there and so I couldn’t resist it!

But, my favorite book was Madeline. You know the big house in Paris all covered with vines. I wanted to be Madeline and I begged my parents to send me to boarding school in Paris so that I could live there and be just like her. That book had such an influence on me that all I wanted to do was learn to speak French! And when I got to Middle School I got that opportunity and I studied it all through high school. I became a French major in college and then I was a French professor for twelve years. Now, I’m a home school mom and so learning and education is a part of my everyday and still so important to me. It is something I really enjoy.

I think back about my education and I have had so many amazing teachers and professors, many of whom I’m still friends with today in person and on Facebook. But the biggest influence to me in terms of learning was my mom because from the time we could sit at the table we were doing lessons every morning for a couple hours. We read books. We did math problems. We did SRA kits, which we thought were the coolest thing. Even though we didn’t realize that this wasn’t what everybody did in the morning, when they were home, on their summer break or in preschool. We cooked. We made diagrams. Um… Diaramas. She would take us to the library twice a week and we would have to check out a certain number of books and read them and then we would write book reports and Venn diagrams and do character studies.

It was just such a part of my childhood and it really taught me the value of learning and how great it is to be able to teach something to someone else and enjoy everything that you are learning. So, even though I wasn’t home schooled as a child I always say that my mom is the one who taught me how to home school because she taught me the joy of learning and teaching and how to bring everything to my children and make it important.

When I finished school I realized that I still wanted to learn, even though I had learned so much I enjoyed it. Growing up my best friends were a dictionary, my Time Life Atlas and then the encyclopedia which I would stay up almost all night reading and then just do cross references with it and there was so much in there. It was just such an incredible resource to have in our home. So I realized that I didn’t want my learning to end. There was still so much out there and learning doesn’t have to end because there is just more than you can ever take in. It’s like a good book that you just don’t want to keep turning the page and learning more and more. Novels come to an end but the best thing is that learning never does because you can always pick something else to learn about and there is always new information. Even if you are studying history there’s more books than you can read. And that is why I am always learning, I always want to learn. My mom always used to joke with me that I would never have brain problems because I am always wanting to learn something new. She was actually impressed with how many things I constantly study even though I have always considered her my mentor as far as learning and teaching.

My current learning obsession though is gardening. I have been reading about it for the last few years and finally built my own 800 sq ft garden last year. And so, I am reading about different kinds of plants, how I can use them, what to plant where, how to help my soil, how to get rid of pests, how to be more organic, be more productive and make the soil healthier for my family and my children. My garden is my hobby but it is also a help for my family.

So, my question for you is… What have you learned today? And, what book really changed your life and want to be a life long learner. I’m so glad that you are here and hope that you come along with us. Thank you and take care.

When does learning begin?

Learning Begins When?

When Does Learning Begin?

When did you learn to read?  How about learning to tell time?  How old were you when you learned your multiplication facts?  We measure learning in stages and many consider learning to begin when formal education does.  In fact, learning begins much sooner.

 

In a recent study, researchers discovered that significant language learning occurs 10 weeks before birth.  We have know for a long time that babies in utero are experiencing all that is around them, however they are also acquiring language skills that will fuel their development after birth.

 

The four arts of language–listening, speaking, reading, writing–are the building blocks of education.  The language arts are what allow us to study all the other disciplines and synthesize what we have learned.  They are also what fuels collaboration and the ability to problem solve.

 

Early learning happens rapidly and without formal instruction.  Children are soaking up all that is around them. Experiences, and the lack there of, greatly shape not only the amount of learning but the potential for learning in the future.  Likewise, we cannot wait for a classroom to educate our children.  Research has shown that the most significant indicator of future learning, is a child’s first five years. This is when the hardware of the brain is built and connects laid.  In addition, the child’s approach to learning and others is solidified.

 

A study by the National Center for Education Statistics showed that the gap in achievement existed from the beginning of kindergarten.

 

“Children’s brains and children’s attitudes are formed in the first five years of life, and children’s opportunity to learn is affected by the homes in which they grow, the communities in which they grow, their respect for learning, their respect for teachers,” says Ravitch. The makings of the achievement gap are already there on the first day of school, and it’s correlated with “different ethnic backgrounds, where poverty and affluence matter a great deal.” (source)

 

The conclusion, learning begins at home and within those first moments of life.  Education is not just a system or a progression through grade levels, it is the development of attitudes, knowledge, and brain connections that lead to a deeper understanding of the world, ability to evaluate data, and the desire to know more.

 

Education for all is not just an economic boon, it is an opportunity for a brighter future for all.  Through an appreciation for lifelong learning and access to educational resources and opportunities, the next generation will have the groundwork laid for their higher achievement.

 

Just as education does not begin in school, it does not end there either. This is why events like Global Learn Day are so vital to the improvement of every citizen of the world.  By lifting one, we lift them all.  We must each choose to never stop learning and pledge to bring the fortuity of educational enrichment to those who still lack this basic need.

 

As One Planet, One People, we have the opportunity and obligation to keep the tide of innovation going but never lose sight of the small steps that have huge impacts.  Exposing babies, still in the womb, to quality language that is free from violence, stress, and excessive volume. By supporting families, we are educating the future.

 

For as Diane Ravich points out, “There is a kind of a wiser understanding of how children grow and develop and learn that recognizes that children’s first educator is their family, and that nurturance really matters.”

Join the Voyage

Contribute to our Timeline of Humankind’s Learning

5 Reasons to Stay Up-to-Date

Why Stay up-to-date?

Staying up to date in this ever changing world can seem overwhelming. Technologies often seem to become obsolete as readily as they are introduced to the market.  However, there are reasons to stay up to date not just in the technology field but in our personal education. Here are five good reasons to keep striving to know more.

 

  • The technological changes are not only something that techies need to be kept informed of. These affect our everyday life and change the face of both education and business.  The advancement in technology is happening at breakneck speed. It may seem impossible to keep abreast of every innovation.  However, general knowledge of the newest mainstream devices and software is beneficial to understand the changing marketplace and make yourself more marketable in your chosen field.

 

Strive to encounter and test out as many new technologies as you can on an ongoing basis.  Even if you do not master them all, you will benefit from the exposure should one of them become commonplace as touch screens and mobile apps have.

 

  • Continuing education helps advance careers and keep individuals highly employable if something should happen with a current employer. Aside from the software that may change your job requirements or how you work; there is always something more to learn to do your job better.  Continuing education enriches your understanding of your field and gives you an advantage in a tough market.  Continuing to grow and learn will not just benefit your resume but your overall achievement in your career.

 

  • Educational practices are ever changing and even those who take a classical approach to education are discovering new benefits and methods to aid all students to learn. Being up to date in the educational field provides new strategies for teaching and deeper understanding of how students learn.  In addition, understanding educational practice and policy allows you to better advocate for the education of the children in your home, state, or country.  It also lends itself to better providing supplements and extracurricular activities to enhance what is being taught and make up for what may be lacking.

 

  • Staying up to date on geo-political news and needs of neighbors near and far is essential to serve the world well. Conquering any crisis requires information. How much harder is it to overcome a problem if you do not even know it exists?  Keep informed of what is going on in the world to the best of your ability.  Use the information you acquire to make judgement calls, protest injustices, and aid worthy causes.  Better informed citizenry leads to more stable nations, accomplished initiatives, and greater aid to those in the most need.

 

  • Being current builds bridges and fuels ingenuity. As the adage goes, “The more you know, the more you grow.” Feeding your brain with the latest studies or newest breakthroughs gives you an advantage to soar higher, more quickly.  Innovative bridges are built in the brain, these in turn become bridges in knowledge, opportunity, and unity.

 

Being in the know not only helps you see how to build a bridge but where it is most needed.  Grow your future, help mankind, and deepen your understanding by continuing to learn and keeping up to date.

 

How do you stay up-to-date?

Why One Planet, One People

Why is our theme One Planet, One People?  The answer is simple yet very complex.  We are all on the same journey around the sun each day.  As the planet spins beneath our feet, our lives continue in regular rhythms that are so alike, despite our appeared differences.

 

Learning is the tie that binds us together, to our past and to our future.  Lessons that will ensure survival, break down walls, and build up rubble.  Our understanding of history, as well as science, and math, is essential to fixing all the problems that plague our modern society.

 

The ability to effectively communicate and problem solve, born of a good education that is rooted in quality literature, creative thinking, innovative exploration, and the arts, both practical and fine, is the mortar that will bridge the gap over what divides us.  Through a pursuit of lifelong education, we each contribute to making changes for the positive on this planet of ours.

 

One Planet, One People is not just our motto, it is our reality.  Do you want to see a better tomorrow?  Invest in understanding the “why” of our present age and then innovate a “how” to fix it.  We all share a common history and the unifying desire to make a difference. Help us expand this desire, your participation and presentations are an integral part of our mission.

 

One Planet, One People is a double sided call to action.  It first asks you to consider what you must study to open your own mind to possibilities, not yet thought, to improve our blue home. Secondly, it begs you to reach beyond your own little world and unite, to greater understand your neighbor, and to carry the torch of freedom born of knowledge to the far corners of the world.

 

This is the mission of Global Learn Day, to reach and to teach.  Not just on October 7th, but every trip around the sun.  It is our hope that this voyage will inspire every passenger to dive deeper into his own self improvement and help the tide to rise all ships that all may get to learn. Join us for our voyage!

What do you think when you are One Planet, One People?

 

It Matters- Education Builds Bridges

Building Bridges

Why it Matters – How GLD Builds a Bridge

Humankind has been building bridges since at least 1600 BC when the Greeks build a bridge over the River Havos (based on the Guinness Book of Records).  It is a part of who we are as a species to overcome challenges, be they natural or man-made. Just as we build a bridge that covers a canyon or spaces over a river, Global Learn Day (GLD) builds a bridge that spaces cultural differences. GLD is a bridge in that people around the globe can use this celebration to reach out to each other. It is Global Learn Day’s purpose to “Celebrate Mankind’s Learning” and in doing that we are able to move a step closer to being “One People, One Planet”.

 

Why does it matter so much? Why is it so important to build a bridge with education? Simply put, because we are a learning people. Since the first tool was made, mankind has been learning, innovating. We seek out knowledge instinctively. If Education is truly its’ own language then Global Learn Day is the bridge that can unite all peoples. It matters because humankind should be seeking out and promoting those things that unite us rather than those that divide us. Global Learn Day is unitive.

How can we unite people across the globe?

Global Learn Day seeks to showcase and promote individuals with innovative ideas and voices in the educational arena without country, region, religion or political differences being factors. We do this because it is through education that we can unite in a shared human experience and promote ideas that will positively affect us on a global scale.

 

Through endeavors like our Timeline of Man’s Learning Project, we are reaching out to all of our voyagers and asking for collaboration so that we can celebrate mankind’s process of learning. Please visit our timeline and leave a comment, adding another marker so that we can as a global community recognize our achievements and plot a course on where to go next. This will then be available to ALL of our voyagers for use in whatever way they see fit to promote education in their communities.

 

We invite each reader to Join the Voyage if he or she has not done so already. Participate! Engage! We look forward to the help of our global community in Building a Bridge to the Future.

 

How do you build bridges? What bridges has education created for you? Where will the next bridge lead you?

 

Don’t forget to like and follow us on Social Media!

Education is Building Bridges

Education and Building Bridges

Building Bridges

Imagine living on a tiny island, just big enough for your home, but too small to land a plane.  What if this island were surrounded by pounding seas and forbidding boulders?  The unnavigable waters would hold you hostage.  You would own your own island but have no access to what you need.  The shore would be in sight, but so very out of reach.  What would you dream of each night?  A bridge!

 

The bridge that connects the most people and solves the greatest hardships is education.  At the principle level, education fundamentally changes our brain.  Our mind is rebuilt and shaped through what we learn.  We become different people, capable of greater feats and more aware of the world beyond us.  This bridge takes us from simple knowledge to the power to use it and create new knowledge and ideas.  With the personal gift of education, we build a bridge from our simple self to our full potential–it is a bridge that never stops growing as long as we keep laying bricks and stringing supports by our studies.

 

As we break free of our ignorance, education bridges the gap to other people.  We gain not only facts by empathy and analytical capability through a solid foundation.  We can compare and contrast our own little world with those far beyond our reach.  Education immerses us in a world that we would never be able to cover by foot, a world that we may never physically experience, but we can grow to understand through our continued quest for deeper understanding.

 

Education builds bridges from the past to the future by rooting us in lessons learned, and inspiring us to innovate in ways never dreamed before.  Our education is the key to an odyssey that reaches to whichever shore where we can strive to land.

 

Beyond the personal gain, and the benefit to the future, education builds a bridge out of poverty.  It lays a path out of despair.  Education provides the superhighway to a better world.

 

As we build our bridges to solve problems, become more employable, and enhance our life experience; we must remember those who are still waiting at the toll bridge, struggling to see past the gate and start building a bridge of their own.

 

When we speak of being One Planet, One People education is the key to our unity.  Through continued study to understand the hardships, obstacles, and geo-political hurdles that our fellow man must face we build a blueprint of what could be. Let us pick up this blue-print and make it reality.

 

By supporting and funding education for those who need it most, we can get every child on the path to a sturdy bridge building career.  Find a way today, to lay the first brick of a bridge for a child in need so that we can all cross the threshold into a safer, healthier, more unified and peaceful tomorrow.

 

How have you helped to build bridges of education? Join us for Global Learn Day 2017 and

Building a Good Foundation

Foundations

Every Bridge Needs a Good Foundation

The Golden Gate Bridge is not only an iconic landmark, it is a feat of engineering.  The soaring red towers are easily recognized by people around the globe.  Everyone marvels at it great span, and the intricate design of its supports. However, without the ever important, but not as photogenic, foundation, the Golden Gate would be in the San Francisco Bay.

 

Like all bridges, the bridge between cultures, countries, and concepts requires a strong and well laid foundation.  In education, this foundation is built by experience, experiments, and general knowledge.

 

The greatest foundational pillar of education is reading.  Through reading bridges can be build to every subject across the curriculum. Fine literature provides the bricks and mortar for bridges to other lands and creative imaginations. With reading, we can become life long, independent learners.  We can also grow to understand our neighbors down the street and on the other side of the globe.

 

This call to well founded education is part of our mission.  Educating the promise of tomorrow and encouraging them to never stop learning, while also bridging the gap between those with educational opportunity and those lacking the basic freedom to an education.

 

Global Learn Day seeks to build good, solid bridges. Bridges between teachers and students. Bridges across oceans and continents. Bridges that span the old and the new, that bring together generations and point us to the future by embracing our past.

 

The bridges we are looking to build are ones that will stand the test of time and continue to grow. Our bridges need good foundations, though, just like the Golden Gate.   We strive to inspire young and old alike to delve deep into their knowledge base in order to share with others, but also to fortify that base with new learning and the motivation to grow.

 

Through continual learning and outreach to others, we can build a solid bridge that will one day envelope the world in educational unity.  There are so many who still need access to education, and many who are not using their access to the fullest potential. The foundation of our prospects and purpose can only be strengthened by coming together as One Planet, One People to learn more and pass on the richness of our knowledge treasure trove.

 

How can you help us fortify our foundation?  What knowledge do you have to share?  Have you learned something new today?

 

Come build along with us…never stop learning, always seek ways to share what you know!

Get To Know – John Hibbs

We recently asked our Global Learn Day Crew to answer a few questions. This was to help you, the individuals on this voyage with us, to get to know us better. First up is John Hibbs, one of the founders of Global Learn Day, who has been with us since our Maiden Voyage. Enjoy getting to know Mr. Hibbs and if you have questions for us, leave them in the comments!

What does Global Learn Day mean to you?

An attempt to increase affordable education to everyone, everywhere. Call it the “Earth Day”of Education.

How did you get involved in GLD?

I outreached to innovative and energetic souls like Dr. Terry Redding. I was lucky and found a half dozen people with such skills and such interest…(In the Redding case, the “bonus” was the skill sets of Redding Family members who could create videos of a kind that are on display here.)

What is your favorite thing to learn?

Lately, the remarkable changes made in the racing sailing world — namely the America’s Cup. (Stay tuned for Mr. Hibb’s latest observations!)

Who was an important teacher in your life?

My parents. Jesuit priests in grammar school. A couple of college professors.

How did you become a life long learner?

I’m not sure I have.

What was the moment you realized you were a life long learner?

Frankly, I haven’t reached that moment.

What is your current learning obsession?

Access and assessment.

Who or what is your learning inspiration?

The game of bridge.

What is your favorite book?

The Clock of the Long Now by Stuart Brand.

Where do you look for new things to learn?

Everywhere. Just open your eyes. Drones fascinate me. The drones used in the America’s Cup were key to the Kiwi victory.

What is something fun about yourself?

I’m a Duck from the University of Oregon and I live just a few blocks from the University.

Stay tuned for our next interview!