MeetOurTeam

Meet the Crew – Peter

Peter
Meet Peter!

My name is Peter. I currently live in West Palm Beach Florida. Some things I do for fun is go to the gym to lift weights, play football or basketball with the boys or go swimming. I prefer to be outdoors. I like to try new things so I will literally do anything that seems like it will turn out to be fun.

Why Global Learn Day?

The way I got involved in Global Learn Day was one day during one of the weekly office staff meeting at Online Training Institute the topic came up. The question “Who thinks this is something they would be interested in being a part of? ” was asked. It all sounded really interesting to me, so I volunteered to join the GLD team.

This event means the ability to learn about different parts of the world from the people who live there. It means that no matter where or when there is always the opportunity to learn something new!

Learning

My Dad is my learning inspiration. Throughout my life I’ve always watched my dad do his best to better himself. Not only did I learn materials I would need for school he also taught me how to be the man I am today. Since birth he has been raising me by himself. He always told me, “No one can take away your education from you.”  That was one of his ways to keep me focused and going down the right path in life.

I look everywhere to learn something new. Books, people, the Internet or sometimes even Social Media . There is really no limit to where you can look and learn something new.

I don’t really have one specific thing that I like to learn. I am a young person and I love to ask questions. Why? Because there is no such thing as a dumb question and if you never ask you will never know! Asking questions is another way of learning.

My favorite book is “Because of Winn-Dixie” by Kate DiCamillo.

 

Thanks Peter for sharing a bit about yourself!

What is your reason for Joining our Voyage? Have you joined our event on Facebook yet?

You can Learn and have Fun!

Fun Ways to Learn Today

Remember to EXPECT

Most of us accept that it is important for all people to receive an education. It is what helps propel us forward as a species, the ability to learn and adapt – to innovate. That doesn’t mean that we are all inspired to learn. There are some who have no interest in education, even if it would benefit them when looking long term.

How do we inspire others to love learning?

Many would say that the answer is to help those being educated have FUN while they learn. Here are some ideas for you to embrace today!

  1. Experiment! Do you want to see a child light up? Tell them you are going to help them work through an experiment! My personal experience tells me that when I tie experiments in with Science projects children respond positively. Try engaging your learners with Snowflake Science and then use this experiment!
  2. X-Ray! Be transparent. Just as an X-ray gives you an image of the structure of the body, so too do we want to encourage a strong foundation, through explaining at an age appropriate level, but not being dishonest. We need to know about the world in ways that are appropriate for our age and development.
  3. Play! While sitting in a more traditional classroom is useful for learning, there are many who can’t sit still for seat work and regular activities. In these instances, play can be stimulating and educational! Recently, my family sat in a circle, laughing, as we learned how to sign “Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See” by Bill Martin and Eric Carle. We were having fun, laughing when we couldn’t keep up and we each learned at least a dozen new signs! When my children began to be quizzed on states and capitals in school, we began playing a game to help them remember the important information. As we drive, we look for license plates that belong to states other than the one we are in. The first person to spy the plate calls out the state name. Then it is a race to see who remembers the capital first! My son is already ready for this section in school because we’ve been playing since his sister went through it. Play can help us learn facts and problem solving skills, and often, it doesn’t feel like we are learning!
  4. Explore! In the US we have National Parks all around us. We can explore and learn all at the same time. The fun of the exploration often masks the education that we are embracing. In Europe, there are castles, churches and museums every where one turns. In exploring our surroundings we are often blessed with an extraordinary educational opportunity. If you don’t have time to go and see something in person, consider going on a Virtual Field Trip.
  5. Create! Have you ever learned how to properly do something via trial and error? Creating a model car is an excellent way to engage in learning. Many people love using their hands, and when you create you are using additional parts of your brain and allowing yourself to look at the material in a new way.
  6. Technology! Incorporating technology is another way to have fun while learning. Yesterday’s flash cards are often today’s apps. Quizlet is used by students of all ages to help them remember information using flashcards, quizzes and even competitions with other classmates. There are plenty of apps available for Android and Apple devices that can help make learning fun.

Just because one is learning does not mean that one isn’t having fun. Fun and learning are not mutually exclusive and for many they are inclusive of each other. Embrace finding your path to learning fun through trial and error! Then, you will be building a bridge to your future.

 

Consider joining us on our voyage! GLD 2017 is less than two months away!

MeetOurTeam

Get to Know – Jennifer

Recently, one of our GLD crew created her introduction video. For those who would prefer to read it, you may continue below!

 

Hi I’m Jennifer Elia! I’m from New Jersey and this is my first Global Learn Day and I’m so excited to be a part of this team! When I was a child I loved to read. I mean, I still do but I would read anything that was put in front of me. In fact, I would read the same cereal box every morning just because it was words and it was there and so I couldn’t resist it!

But, my favorite book was Madeline. You know the big house in Paris all covered with vines. I wanted to be Madeline and I begged my parents to send me to boarding school in Paris so that I could live there and be just like her. That book had such an influence on me that all I wanted to do was learn to speak French! And when I got to Middle School I got that opportunity and I studied it all through high school. I became a French major in college and then I was a French professor for twelve years. Now, I’m a home school mom and so learning and education is a part of my everyday and still so important to me. It is something I really enjoy.

I think back about my education and I have had so many amazing teachers and professors, many of whom I’m still friends with today in person and on Facebook. But the biggest influence to me in terms of learning was my mom because from the time we could sit at the table we were doing lessons every morning for a couple hours. We read books. We did math problems. We did SRA kits, which we thought were the coolest thing. Even though we didn’t realize that this wasn’t what everybody did in the morning, when they were home, on their summer break or in preschool. We cooked. We made diagrams. Um… Diaramas. She would take us to the library twice a week and we would have to check out a certain number of books and read them and then we would write book reports and Venn diagrams and do character studies.

It was just such a part of my childhood and it really taught me the value of learning and how great it is to be able to teach something to someone else and enjoy everything that you are learning. So, even though I wasn’t home schooled as a child I always say that my mom is the one who taught me how to home school because she taught me the joy of learning and teaching and how to bring everything to my children and make it important.

When I finished school I realized that I still wanted to learn, even though I had learned so much I enjoyed it. Growing up my best friends were a dictionary, my Time Life Atlas and then the encyclopedia which I would stay up almost all night reading and then just do cross references with it and there was so much in there. It was just such an incredible resource to have in our home. So I realized that I didn’t want my learning to end. There was still so much out there and learning doesn’t have to end because there is just more than you can ever take in. It’s like a good book that you just don’t want to keep turning the page and learning more and more. Novels come to an end but the best thing is that learning never does because you can always pick something else to learn about and there is always new information. Even if you are studying history there’s more books than you can read. And that is why I am always learning, I always want to learn. My mom always used to joke with me that I would never have brain problems because I am always wanting to learn something new. She was actually impressed with how many things I constantly study even though I have always considered her my mentor as far as learning and teaching.

My current learning obsession though is gardening. I have been reading about it for the last few years and finally built my own 800 sq ft garden last year. And so, I am reading about different kinds of plants, how I can use them, what to plant where, how to help my soil, how to get rid of pests, how to be more organic, be more productive and make the soil healthier for my family and my children. My garden is my hobby but it is also a help for my family.

So, my question for you is… What have you learned today? And, what book really changed your life and want to be a life long learner. I’m so glad that you are here and hope that you come along with us. Thank you and take care.

When does learning begin?

Learning Begins When?

When Does Learning Begin?

When did you learn to read?  How about learning to tell time?  How old were you when you learned your multiplication facts?  We measure learning in stages and many consider learning to begin when formal education does.  In fact, learning begins much sooner.

 

In a recent study, researchers discovered that significant language learning occurs 10 weeks before birth.  We have know for a long time that babies in utero are experiencing all that is around them, however they are also acquiring language skills that will fuel their development after birth.

 

The four arts of language–listening, speaking, reading, writing–are the building blocks of education.  The language arts are what allow us to study all the other disciplines and synthesize what we have learned.  They are also what fuels collaboration and the ability to problem solve.

 

Early learning happens rapidly and without formal instruction.  Children are soaking up all that is around them. Experiences, and the lack there of, greatly shape not only the amount of learning but the potential for learning in the future.  Likewise, we cannot wait for a classroom to educate our children.  Research has shown that the most significant indicator of future learning, is a child’s first five years. This is when the hardware of the brain is built and connects laid.  In addition, the child’s approach to learning and others is solidified.

 

A study by the National Center for Education Statistics showed that the gap in achievement existed from the beginning of kindergarten.

 

“Children’s brains and children’s attitudes are formed in the first five years of life, and children’s opportunity to learn is affected by the homes in which they grow, the communities in which they grow, their respect for learning, their respect for teachers,” says Ravitch. The makings of the achievement gap are already there on the first day of school, and it’s correlated with “different ethnic backgrounds, where poverty and affluence matter a great deal.” (source)

 

The conclusion, learning begins at home and within those first moments of life.  Education is not just a system or a progression through grade levels, it is the development of attitudes, knowledge, and brain connections that lead to a deeper understanding of the world, ability to evaluate data, and the desire to know more.

 

Education for all is not just an economic boon, it is an opportunity for a brighter future for all.  Through an appreciation for lifelong learning and access to educational resources and opportunities, the next generation will have the groundwork laid for their higher achievement.

 

Just as education does not begin in school, it does not end there either. This is why events like Global Learn Day are so vital to the improvement of every citizen of the world.  By lifting one, we lift them all.  We must each choose to never stop learning and pledge to bring the fortuity of educational enrichment to those who still lack this basic need.

 

As One Planet, One People, we have the opportunity and obligation to keep the tide of innovation going but never lose sight of the small steps that have huge impacts.  Exposing babies, still in the womb, to quality language that is free from violence, stress, and excessive volume. By supporting families, we are educating the future.

 

For as Diane Ravich points out, “There is a kind of a wiser understanding of how children grow and develop and learn that recognizes that children’s first educator is their family, and that nurturance really matters.”

Join the Voyage

Contribute to our Timeline of Humankind’s Learning

Overcoming Obstacles

NELSON MANDELA

Overcoming Educational Obstacles

 

Many of us are lucky to have had the biggest obstacle to our education be ourselves. There was a time that this wasn’t the norm. For much of human history, we have had to overcome significant obstacles to obtain knowledge. In the US, many have heard the “I had to walk five miles uphill to get to school”. Perhaps, our grandparents were trying to impress upon us the gift that our ease of education is. There are still parts of the world that haven’t knocked down as many of these obstacles though. Places that educate based on some factor that the individual has no control over. Places where war has prevented education from being a safe thing, as shown in this article.

Admittedly, this is old information, but the concept that in 2016 WAR was what prevents children from receiving an education is heartbreaking to say the least. Not enough has changed to make that untrue in 2017. Education, which we firmly believe builds a bridge for children to access a better future, should be available to all people. Nelson Mandela emphasized the importance of distance education to overcoming obstacles in South Africa and the same is true all over the world. You can listen to his speech here.

 

Today, there are opportunities for children in primary and secondary schools to learn via distance education. Additionally, schools around the world offer distance education options. This opens the door for those who are homebound, unable to travel great distances or unable to handle the stress or stimulation from a traditional education to overcome and achieve their educational goals. Nelson Mandela recognized this two decades ago but as a people, we are just beginning to fully embrace it. If we could provide distance education options (even books for them to learn at their own pace from) to the South Sudanese children mentioned above, we would be opening them to a whole new world. Hopefully, that would be their bridge to a better future.

 

Organizations like War Child, support mothers and children in war torn countries. One of the most important ways is to educate them. This way, they can read the important signs…

Danger – Landmines

Putting it in perspective, no obstacle I have met is half as hard as a child in Sudan. It’s time to build bridges and share with those around us the ways we have found that help us overcome our educational obstacles.

How do you overcome obstacles? Feel free to suggest a distance education provider!

Education

Education in the Past

Education is Our History

Education is a part of human history since the very first moment.  It has taken on various forms, however education is what has pushed civilizations forward and changed the course of history.

 

The education of young in the ways of survival was not only a tradition, but a necessity.  Every generation passing their knowledge and skills onto the next to ensure the prosperity and continuation of a tribe or family.

 

About three thousand years ago, the written word was born. Hyroglyphics, Cuniform, Sandskrit were among the first languages used to record ideas and knowledge.  The development of writing and reading created a new class of literate people as well as a new job, the scribe.  Across Africa, Asia, and the Middle East, the tide of education was changing thanks to a piece of papyrus and a stylus.

 

As civilization advanced, so did the definition of education, giving way to great thinkers and teachers, such as Socrates.  Socrates is still known as one of the greatest teachers to have ever lived.  Nearly two and a half millennia later, his style of educating is revered and employed by professors.  The dawn of higher education ushered in the value of thought.  No longer was it considered enough to know how to survive, man had learned to thrive.

Formal Education

Over the next thousand years, formal education in schools began to take root as the private study and generational tutelage continued in the home.  In the early middle ages, these cathedral schools led to the development of universities, coming from the Latin for universitas magistrorum et scholarium, a community of teachers and scholars.

 

Thinkers and motivated self-learners, gathered to discuss, ponder, and debate.  Thought and written word collided to birth the greatest learning tool the world has ever known, the book!  While books remained rare for centuries the ability to read became a hallmark of success in elite circles and ruling classes.

 

As the production of books became more readily available, the literacy rates exploded.  Self education came to the masses.  Families read together for entertainment and education.  The art of forming letters in ink was taught by tutors and practiced regularly.  Reading and writing became the building blocks of every education.

 

Literacy rates have continued to climb. “While only 12% of the people in the world could read and write in 1820, today the share has reversed: only 17% of the world population remains illiterate.” (source) The 19th century saw the ability to read become universal in the western world with near 100% literacy rates.

 

The thirst for knowledge and the premium placed on education led to the push for education for all and the advent of public schools.  While the fight for education for all continues, significant progress has been made.  Access to basic school supplies, uniforms, and books being the greatest hurdle for many who desire an education.

The face of education has changed drastically from family lessons of survival to socratic societies, medieval universities, and one room school houses to modern, computerized classrooms. Despite these changes in how we approach teaching, the essence of education is the same.  The goal of every generation must still be passing on vital information, skills, and tools to inspire independent thinking, just as our early ancestors and Socrates did.  Self education, literacy, and the art of writing are just as important now in our digital age as they were in the days of hand copied manuscripts.

 

Educational implements have changed but true and good education never will.  It is the bridge from the past to an ever changing future bolstered by critical thinking, creativity, exploration, depth of knowledge, and quality literature. This is our past, this is our future, and we must never stop until every child has the opportunity to learn and dream.

Book with Reading

Literature and Learning

Literature and You, Perfect Together

Have you read a good book lately?  Literature is one of the hallmarks of a developed culture.  It synthesizes the values, beliefs, and societal make up of time and era.  Even books that aren’t explicitly historical fiction present a commentary of the lives and times the author experienced.

 

Andrew Pudewa, education advocate and founder of the Institute for Excellence in Writing, observes that like anything you can’t get out what you don’t put in.  Our brains are like computer processors, they need the reliable connectors and high quality coding to produce good results.

 

Reading opens door and worlds to children and adults. Through books we can explore times and regions that would be impossible for us to access otherwise.  Reading truly is fundamental as the old commercial jingle said.  It is the building block of our civilization and our future innovations. In his book, How Literature Plays with the Brain, Paul B. Armstrong observes, “Literature matters, for what it reveals about human experience, and the very different perspective of neuroscience on how the brain works is part of that story.”

 

Books Are the Way of the Future

With all the technological advances, it is easy to focus on the STEM curriculum in the hopes of raising up a generation prepared and enthusiastic about all that is possible in this high tech world.  However, it is important to have roots before we have wings.  Literature can give us those roots and the brain power to soar.

 

Science has shown that reading actually stimulates the brain in a way that it actually believes it is doing something that it is not. This is called embodied cognition.  This same principle is employed by athletes who use visualization as a manner to enhance their skills.  When a basketball player uses visualization, it triggers the same centers of the brain used to physically play the game.  In this way, embodied cognition truly takes our brain to the place and time of what we are reading, allowing us to experience and problem solve on a high plane that watching the same story on television.

 

Literature also teaches empathy and understanding of other points of view.  Theory of Mind is “the branch of cognitive science that investigates how we ascribe mental states to other persons and how we use the states to explain and predict the actions of those other persons.”  Studies have shown that children who have more literature read to them have keener theory of mind and are better able to empathize with others.

 

While reading is the important part, it also matters what we read.  As stated above, you only get out what you put in.  Informational reading is not the same as deep reading of literature. The reading of complex literature with the drama, suspense, and intricate details creates life like images in our brains that exercise our brain and expand our ability to think.  Decoding words is not enough, we need to be reading literature that pulls us into the story.

 

Falling In Love Is Literature

In a Time magazine article about the value of reading literature, it states, “The deep reader, protected from distractions and attuned to the nuances of language, enters a state that psychologist Victor Nell, in a study of the psychology of pleasure reading, likens to a hypnotic trance. Nell found that when readers are enjoying the experience the most, the pace of their reading actually slows. The combination of fast, fluent decoding of words and slow, unhurried progress on the page gives deep readers time to enrich their reading with reflection, analysis, and their own memories and opinions. It gives them time to establish an intimate relationship with the author, the two of them engaged in an extended and ardent conversation like people falling in love.”

 

How romantic is that?  Books are not only our escapes but the gym for our minds.  As we teach children to love learning we must also instill a love of fine literature to fill their minds with rich language and shape their theory of mind for the benefit of the world at large.  As One Planet, One People; providing the access to quality literature books to all children can go a long way toward building the bridges to a future of peace and harmony.

 

What has literature done for you? What piece of literature have you loved?

Education is Its' Own Language

Education is Its’ Own Language

What was your first language?

 

Spanish? English? French? Education? Wait. What? Education isn’t a language! I would argue that it is. Language is a means for people to communicate, to reach an understanding. Can education not help within those areas? It can and does.

 

Education is a way to come together and communicate with each other. I might have nothing in common with the person standing next to me. We can come from different cultures, have different religions and different languages. The one thing we might share is an understanding of math, or a love of Victorian authors, or Renaissance artists. It is our education about things that allow us to seek and find common ground with those around us.

 

The all-encompassing mission of Global Learn Day is that while we celebrate mankind’s learning we are promoting the concept of “One Planet, One People”. We are a collaborative people, building up ideas one on top of the other, expounding on previous research. It is through this language of education that we come together and improve the human condition.

 

This link lists 100 influential scientists. Looking through the list you find individuals from a variety of eras, cultures and languages. They spoke the same language though. Education opened up their mind and engaged their curiosity. Via their education and their willingness to continue to learn they were able to contribute to man’s understanding and knowledge long term.

This is the language of education. The desire to never stop learning, to never stop sharing what you have learned with others. This contribution has the ability to shape the world, to Build a Bridge to the Future. Never stop learning. Never stop speaking the language of education.

What is your favorite thing to learn about?

As always, consider joining us this year for Global Learn Day 2017!