Meet A Presenter: Silence, On Lit!

Today we meet two special teachers from France who will be presenting their program called, “Silence, on lit!” (Quiet, we’re reading!)

Elise Boirel is a 44 year old mother of two boys aged 14 and 13. She lives in the Paris suburbs. Ms. Boirel has a BA in Marketing, a teaching degree, and a certificate of English proficiency from the University of Cambridge.

Ms. Boirel was a marketing executive who transitioned to becoming an English teacher in 2004. She has been teaching middle school since them. “I love working on projects with other teachers, ” she says, “especially on projects combining English and history

 

Ms. Boirel’s colleague, Karine, is joining her on this project. Karine Riviere is 42 years old, married for 16 years, and the mother of a 15 year old son and 12 year old daughter.

Mrs. Riviere studied history at the Pantheon Sorbonne University in Paris. She also holds a degree in contemporary history and a certificate in geography. She has been the CAPES of history and geography for the past 17 years, and has been at her current school for 13 of those years.

Mrs. Riviere is the principal teacher of the 8 year old class. She has had many exciting opportunities to orchestrate projects with her students. These include a memorial for la paix a Caen with a visit to the deployment beaches in Normandy and the American cemetery at Omaha Beach. Another project included the study of a play by Moliere, the aristocratic gentleman, that included a visit to Vaux le Vicomte. In addition, Mrs. Riviere has studied the history of the American Revolution, the philosophy of the Renaissance and its consequences on the French Revolution with her students.

This year, she launched a campus wide project, “Silence, on lit!” which she eagerly looks forward to presenting for Global Learn Day.

We welcome everyone to teach the world something new. Do you have something to share? Let us know, there are a few slots left!

Welcome aboard Ms. Boirel and Mrs. Riviere, we can’t wait to be your students!

 

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Where in the World? Building Map Skills

Globetrotting on a Map

Our planet is so vast. From mile high peaks to low lying islands, arctic tundra to arid rain forests.  The beauty and splendor is amazing.  This breathtaking canvas is occupied by 7.6 billion people and organized by the invisible borderlines of 195 countries. How many could you find on an unlabelled map?

Exploring a map or atlas is an adventure in itself.  The different names, the topography, the climates and animal habitats all weave a tapestry like none other.  As One Planet, One People, we have so much in common but, also so much to share that makes us each unique.  Understanding our world begins with understanding our globe!

Why Learn Map Skills?

With the advent of GPS our reliance on technology has decreased our perceived need to learn how to read a map.  Moreover, not only are we not versed in how to uses maps, but are less likely to even encounter one.

Map skills are still an important ingredient to understanding your surroundings and the world at large.  When listening to the news, our knowledge of geography helps us better understand where items of interest are happening and how they could effect other parts of the world.

How to Build Better Map Skills

The easiest way to learn more about maps of the world is to spend time exploring them.  Hear a geographic name you don’t recognize?  Look it up!  Not sure which countries border an area in conflict? Pull out an atlas and find out.

Here are four other projects to build map skills for young and old:

  1.  Google up some geography. While technology has made us less able to self-orient, it has also opened doors to experiencing geography like never before. Instead of just a static drawing or photograph in a book, interactive maps, such as Google Earth, brings the maps to life.  Spending time exploring and “voyaging” via Google Earth you can become a globetrotter right from your living room. There are numerous projects online to enhance your learning.
  2. Build the world by hand! Making a globe by hand is a great way to gain an understanding of where places are and how they relate to each other.  Globes can be made from pumpkins, paper mache, styrofoam balls, or printable that are assembled.
  3. Map what you read. Find locations mentioned in the books, and news that you read.  Learn more about the area around the point you discovered.  Get a wall map and mark each of these spots to keep track of your reading travel.
  4. Play a game. Playing games, both board games and video games, that include travel is a fun and easy way to learn more geography. Puzzles, as well, turning playing into learning. Try some of these:

Where will you explore today?

 

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Why Does GLD Start in New Zealand?

Auckland, New Zealand

If you are new to Global Learn Day, you may think that beginning our voyage in this location is arbitrary. It is, however, far from that. The International Date Line decides where we begin our day and that place is New Zealand. Auckland is a major city in New Zealand and therefore a logical choice. We use the International Date Line because that is when we, mankind, says that days begin and end. The day begins in New Zealand as the furthest east point of the International Date Line.

The sun is constantly rising in some part of the world. As I type this with night haven fallen and the darkness surrounding my home, there are many people just waking up for their day tomorrow. We need one date, that we all follow, or at least our society has decided that we do. I went looking for a better explanation of the International Date Line and found an excellent one here.

Basically, just like in learning, we have to start somewhere. Why not Auckland?

 

Do you know someone who loves providing explanations? Are you that person? Contact us and participate in Global Learn Day!

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