Timetable

Guided Education

Do you remember the last conversation that engaged you? Perhaps it sparked an interest that caused you to continue searching for information when you sat back down in front of your computer or visited your local library. What was the topic? Why did you become so engaged?

 

Global Learn Day seeks to engage all people by uniting them in a love for education and learning. In order to do this effectively we, the Crew, search far and wide for engaging information leading up to our event and presenters for the day of our event. We ask you, our voyagers, to help us by recommending individuals who share our desire to use education to help us achieve the idea of “One People, One Planet”.

 

This is an opportunity for all to participate and many to have a voice. Our most notable Key Note Speaker was Nelson Mandela, many years ago. You can still listen to his address here. Along with the audio, we have made his words available to read for those who need visual assistance to receive his message. Global Learn Day depends on educators and students to share their voices in order to present a valuable experience for all of our voyagers. If you, or someone you know, should be participating and presenting at Global Learn Day, you can find more information and our application here at our Call for Presenters.

 

If you would like to participate in any way for Global Learn Day please contact us and/or Join the Voyage!

Education is Building Bridges

Education and Building Bridges

Building Bridges

Imagine living on a tiny island, just big enough for your home, but too small to land a plane.  What if this island were surrounded by pounding seas and forbidding boulders?  The unnavigable waters would hold you hostage.  You would own your own island but have no access to what you need.  The shore would be in sight, but so very out of reach.  What would you dream of each night?  A bridge!

 

The bridge that connects the most people and solves the greatest hardships is education.  At the principle level, education fundamentally changes our brain.  Our mind is rebuilt and shaped through what we learn.  We become different people, capable of greater feats and more aware of the world beyond us.  This bridge takes us from simple knowledge to the power to use it and create new knowledge and ideas.  With the personal gift of education, we build a bridge from our simple self to our full potential–it is a bridge that never stops growing as long as we keep laying bricks and stringing supports by our studies.

 

As we break free of our ignorance, education bridges the gap to other people.  We gain not only facts by empathy and analytical capability through a solid foundation.  We can compare and contrast our own little world with those far beyond our reach.  Education immerses us in a world that we would never be able to cover by foot, a world that we may never physically experience, but we can grow to understand through our continued quest for deeper understanding.

 

Education builds bridges from the past to the future by rooting us in lessons learned, and inspiring us to innovate in ways never dreamed before.  Our education is the key to an odyssey that reaches to whichever shore where we can strive to land.

 

Beyond the personal gain, and the benefit to the future, education builds a bridge out of poverty.  It lays a path out of despair.  Education provides the superhighway to a better world.

 

As we build our bridges to solve problems, become more employable, and enhance our life experience; we must remember those who are still waiting at the toll bridge, struggling to see past the gate and start building a bridge of their own.

 

When we speak of being One Planet, One People education is the key to our unity.  Through continued study to understand the hardships, obstacles, and geo-political hurdles that our fellow man must face we build a blueprint of what could be. Let us pick up this blue-print and make it reality.

 

By supporting and funding education for those who need it most, we can get every child on the path to a sturdy bridge building career.  Find a way today, to lay the first brick of a bridge for a child in need so that we can all cross the threshold into a safer, healthier, more unified and peaceful tomorrow.

 

How have you helped to build bridges of education? Join us for Global Learn Day 2017 and

Building a Good Foundation

Foundations

Every Bridge Needs a Good Foundation

The Golden Gate Bridge is not only an iconic landmark, it is a feat of engineering.  The soaring red towers are easily recognized by people around the globe.  Everyone marvels at it great span, and the intricate design of its supports. However, without the ever important, but not as photogenic, foundation, the Golden Gate would be in the San Francisco Bay.

 

Like all bridges, the bridge between cultures, countries, and concepts requires a strong and well laid foundation.  In education, this foundation is built by experience, experiments, and general knowledge.

 

The greatest foundational pillar of education is reading.  Through reading bridges can be build to every subject across the curriculum. Fine literature provides the bricks and mortar for bridges to other lands and creative imaginations. With reading, we can become life long, independent learners.  We can also grow to understand our neighbors down the street and on the other side of the globe.

 

This call to well founded education is part of our mission.  Educating the promise of tomorrow and encouraging them to never stop learning, while also bridging the gap between those with educational opportunity and those lacking the basic freedom to an education.

 

Global Learn Day seeks to build good, solid bridges. Bridges between teachers and students. Bridges across oceans and continents. Bridges that span the old and the new, that bring together generations and point us to the future by embracing our past.

 

The bridges we are looking to build are ones that will stand the test of time and continue to grow. Our bridges need good foundations, though, just like the Golden Gate.   We strive to inspire young and old alike to delve deep into their knowledge base in order to share with others, but also to fortify that base with new learning and the motivation to grow.

 

Through continual learning and outreach to others, we can build a solid bridge that will one day envelope the world in educational unity.  There are so many who still need access to education, and many who are not using their access to the fullest potential. The foundation of our prospects and purpose can only be strengthened by coming together as One Planet, One People to learn more and pass on the richness of our knowledge treasure trove.

 

How can you help us fortify our foundation?  What knowledge do you have to share?  Have you learned something new today?

 

Come build along with us…never stop learning, always seek ways to share what you know!

Hibb’s Observations on the America Cup

As promised, John Hibb’s observations of the 2017 America’s Cup.

The Kiwis Rode in on a Bike. And Flew Out with the Cup.

We haven’t seen a thrashing this bad since Cassius Clay whupped Sony Liston. Clay, a heavy underdog, showed the power of foot speed, courage and that he could take a hit. All made more impressive by youth, innovation and ability to adjust to tough new challenges..

Plus, a terrific reminder of how the Wright Brothers whupped a race horse and left the horse in the dust.

But first….about the America’s Cup.

There is nothing bigger in whole entire sailing world than which TEAM takes home the Cup. (Entry fees, to begin, start at around $30 million bucks.) But who cares about the price?

Here, the difference was clear cut:

The boys from New Zealand were quick, dazzeling and superb. The opposition — Larry Ellison, founder of Oracle – got an old fashioned ass kicking. Particularly appropriate because Ellison dictated the design rules and set Bermuda as the venue.

What he didn’t count on was Kiwi Magic…a carryover from the days of “Black Magic”.

No matter. This was not about magic. In the end, Oracle was out-classed, out-manned, out-gunned by smart folks from Down Under.

In my book the Kiwis had it all the way.

Guess what? Big League sailboat racing will never be the same. In ten knots of breeze these machines are jaw-dropping rocket ships — with electronic wizardry that would amaze Google, Amazon and the whole geek world.. (Not to mention all those brainiacs at Oracle.)

But the biggest change came when the Kiwis substituted ordinary ‘coffee grinders’ for athletes recruited from the Tour de France. The message: Screw you Larry. We have a better way!

Today, the question that Ellison has yet to answer is a why billionaire software guru forgot this maxim: Sailors win races by a keen view of the seascape. What better view than high on a bicycle seat? Sure. Leg power is more powerful than arm power. But, far more important is that teamwork and collaboration is the heart of all great performances. Larry: Ask your grinders. Which team had the better collaborative platform? A better view of the whole entire race course?

Also this: While the America’s Cup vocabulary has changed from jib, spinnaker and mainsail to dagger boards, wings and foils….and “Fly Time” has become the most important new metric, the new dictum is you are either ‘up on your foil’ …..or you are looking at the tail end of a rocket ship.

Don’t blink! In a heart beat you could miss the knock out.

The simple truth is this: Foot speed really, really counts. Disagree? Ask anyone who saw Cassius Clay — (aka Muhammed Ali) — put a whuppin on Sonny Liston. For many of the same reasons, it was the same for the Kiwis.

Get To Know – John Hibbs

We recently asked our Global Learn Day Crew to answer a few questions. This was to help you, the individuals on this voyage with us, to get to know us better. First up is John Hibbs, one of the founders of Global Learn Day, who has been with us since our Maiden Voyage. Enjoy getting to know Mr. Hibbs and if you have questions for us, leave them in the comments!

What does Global Learn Day mean to you?

An attempt to increase affordable education to everyone, everywhere. Call it the “Earth Day”of Education.

How did you get involved in GLD?

I outreached to innovative and energetic souls like Dr. Terry Redding. I was lucky and found a half dozen people with such skills and such interest…(In the Redding case, the “bonus” was the skill sets of Redding Family members who could create videos of a kind that are on display here.)

What is your favorite thing to learn?

Lately, the remarkable changes made in the racing sailing world — namely the America’s Cup. (Stay tuned for Mr. Hibb’s latest observations!)

Who was an important teacher in your life?

My parents. Jesuit priests in grammar school. A couple of college professors.

How did you become a life long learner?

I’m not sure I have.

What was the moment you realized you were a life long learner?

Frankly, I haven’t reached that moment.

What is your current learning obsession?

Access and assessment.

Who or what is your learning inspiration?

The game of bridge.

What is your favorite book?

The Clock of the Long Now by Stuart Brand.

Where do you look for new things to learn?

Everywhere. Just open your eyes. Drones fascinate me. The drones used in the America’s Cup were key to the Kiwi victory.

What is something fun about yourself?

I’m a Duck from the University of Oregon and I live just a few blocks from the University.

Stay tuned for our next interview!

Book with Reading

Literature and Learning

Literature and You, Perfect Together

Have you read a good book lately?  Literature is one of the hallmarks of a developed culture.  It synthesizes the values, beliefs, and societal make up of time and era.  Even books that aren’t explicitly historical fiction present a commentary of the lives and times the author experienced.

 

Andrew Pudewa, education advocate and founder of the Institute for Excellence in Writing, observes that like anything you can’t get out what you don’t put in.  Our brains are like computer processors, they need the reliable connectors and high quality coding to produce good results.

 

Reading opens door and worlds to children and adults. Through books we can explore times and regions that would be impossible for us to access otherwise.  Reading truly is fundamental as the old commercial jingle said.  It is the building block of our civilization and our future innovations. In his book, How Literature Plays with the Brain, Paul B. Armstrong observes, “Literature matters, for what it reveals about human experience, and the very different perspective of neuroscience on how the brain works is part of that story.”

 

Books Are the Way of the Future

With all the technological advances, it is easy to focus on the STEM curriculum in the hopes of raising up a generation prepared and enthusiastic about all that is possible in this high tech world.  However, it is important to have roots before we have wings.  Literature can give us those roots and the brain power to soar.

 

Science has shown that reading actually stimulates the brain in a way that it actually believes it is doing something that it is not. This is called embodied cognition.  This same principle is employed by athletes who use visualization as a manner to enhance their skills.  When a basketball player uses visualization, it triggers the same centers of the brain used to physically play the game.  In this way, embodied cognition truly takes our brain to the place and time of what we are reading, allowing us to experience and problem solve on a high plane that watching the same story on television.

 

Literature also teaches empathy and understanding of other points of view.  Theory of Mind is “the branch of cognitive science that investigates how we ascribe mental states to other persons and how we use the states to explain and predict the actions of those other persons.”  Studies have shown that children who have more literature read to them have keener theory of mind and are better able to empathize with others.

 

While reading is the important part, it also matters what we read.  As stated above, you only get out what you put in.  Informational reading is not the same as deep reading of literature. The reading of complex literature with the drama, suspense, and intricate details creates life like images in our brains that exercise our brain and expand our ability to think.  Decoding words is not enough, we need to be reading literature that pulls us into the story.

 

Falling In Love Is Literature

In a Time magazine article about the value of reading literature, it states, “The deep reader, protected from distractions and attuned to the nuances of language, enters a state that psychologist Victor Nell, in a study of the psychology of pleasure reading, likens to a hypnotic trance. Nell found that when readers are enjoying the experience the most, the pace of their reading actually slows. The combination of fast, fluent decoding of words and slow, unhurried progress on the page gives deep readers time to enrich their reading with reflection, analysis, and their own memories and opinions. It gives them time to establish an intimate relationship with the author, the two of them engaged in an extended and ardent conversation like people falling in love.”

 

How romantic is that?  Books are not only our escapes but the gym for our minds.  As we teach children to love learning we must also instill a love of fine literature to fill their minds with rich language and shape their theory of mind for the benefit of the world at large.  As One Planet, One People; providing the access to quality literature books to all children can go a long way toward building the bridges to a future of peace and harmony.

 

What has literature done for you? What piece of literature have you loved?

Education is Its' Own Language

Education is Its’ Own Language

What was your first language?

 

Spanish? English? French? Education? Wait. What? Education isn’t a language! I would argue that it is. Language is a means for people to communicate, to reach an understanding. Can education not help within those areas? It can and does.

 

Education is a way to come together and communicate with each other. I might have nothing in common with the person standing next to me. We can come from different cultures, have different religions and different languages. The one thing we might share is an understanding of math, or a love of Victorian authors, or Renaissance artists. It is our education about things that allow us to seek and find common ground with those around us.

 

The all-encompassing mission of Global Learn Day is that while we celebrate mankind’s learning we are promoting the concept of “One Planet, One People”. We are a collaborative people, building up ideas one on top of the other, expounding on previous research. It is through this language of education that we come together and improve the human condition.

 

This link lists 100 influential scientists. Looking through the list you find individuals from a variety of eras, cultures and languages. They spoke the same language though. Education opened up their mind and engaged their curiosity. Via their education and their willingness to continue to learn they were able to contribute to man’s understanding and knowledge long term.

This is the language of education. The desire to never stop learning, to never stop sharing what you have learned with others. This contribution has the ability to shape the world, to Build a Bridge to the Future. Never stop learning. Never stop speaking the language of education.

What is your favorite thing to learn about?

As always, consider joining us this year for Global Learn Day 2017!

Boredom has its' own value.

The Value of Boredom

When the Activity Ends

School is out and the exhilaration of not having anything to do has already worn off.  How many children have complained, “I’m bored!” just days after summer break begins?

 

Pinterest is full of “boredom buster” ideas and tutorials.  Local libraries ramp up their offerings to accommodate the aimless and bored children.  Then there are camps for every interest and skill under the sun.  None of these are bad ideas, and each has value in its own right, however so does boredom.

Going, Going, Going

We live in a “let’s entertain me” culture.  The children of today are not only inundated with television in every public place, but have grown up in organized play for the most part.  While generations past ran outside to play with the neighborhood kids and didn’t return until dusk.  Today’s generation is most likely to only play at scheduled playdates or organized sports.

 

Boredom is the dreaded disease of down time.  It is something that needs to be cured, immediately and effectively.  Parents are often worn down trying to keep every moment interesting and engaging for their children.  Have you ever wondered what’s the worst that can come of boredom?

 

But What Will We DO?

True, idle hands are the devil’s playground, but idle minds are fertile ground waiting to bloom.  If there is no down time how will new ideas be explored, let alone formed?  Boredom may be uncomfortable at first, but it is a necessary distress.  Once the entertainment ends, we are left with ourselves.  It is just us and our mind.  What will we think?  What could we do?

 

Our pace of life is extremely busy.  We are on the go so much and hardly stop to smell the roses.  It is difficult even for adults to find themselves with nothing to do.  On the other side of uncomfortable, though, is innovation and creativity. We need to be bored sometimes.  According to Andreas Elpidorou of the University of Louisville,  “In the absence of boredom, one would remain trapped in unfulfilling situations, and miss out on many emotionally, cognitively, and socially rewarding experiences. Boredom is both a warning that we are not doing what we want to be doing and a ‘push’ that motivates us to switch goals and projects.”

 

Sweet Summertime

 

Summer break is the perfect time to practice boredom and see where it leads.  In the absence of noise, distraction, and obligation the mind is allowed freedom to wander.  In the wandering, the brain relaxes and switches to creative problem solving mode.  New ideas take shape and the person finds something to do.  Not something he has to do, but something he wants to do.  Boredom allows you the freedom to discover your true passions and evaluate your likes and dislikes.

 

In fact, psychologists suggest that it is most beneficial for children to have a “boring” summer.  In the doldrums of inactivity, they are afforded the opportunity to self-motivate.  This motivation allows freedom to discover not only the world around them, but the one inside their own head.  If adults are always prescribing and directing what a child should do, how will she ever know what she wants to do?

 

Facing boredom head on and pushing through it, is “developmental achievement” for children.  Even the sulking at being bored has value.  The children are not wasting their time but taking their time.

 

In The Conquest of Happiness, Philosopher Bertrand Russell wrote, “A child develops best when, like a young plant, he is left undisturbed in the same soil. Too much travel, too much variety of impressions, are not good for the young, and cause them as they grow up to become incapable of enduring fruitful monotony.”

 

So, the next time your child comes to you with the age old gripe, don’t rush in to save the day.  Instead, encourage him to sit a while and just relax, explore something new, or lie down on a blanket under the clouds and just daydream.  Resist the temptation to rush him on to something new.  Let the effects of boredom run their course. His mind and your summer will be better for it.

 

What have you discovered while being bored?

Climb to new heights with learning.

Why Does Life Long Learning Matter?

Do you remember fourth grade?

Do you remember everything that you learned?  While you may remember that year, just like exercise if you don’t use it, you lose it.  Our brains need to be worked and stretched.  Putting an end date on learning limits the potential of our mind. Lifelong learning is essential.

 

Imagine if you exercised consistently, intensively, and productively for 12 years straight, then you stopped and never did a single sit-up, jog, or workout again.  What would happen?  While your body gained flexibility, endurance, and muscle mass during those 12 years, the years afterwards would strip it all away. If you woke up and thought, “I exercised so intensely for all those years, I’ll go run a marathon today!” You would quickly come to realize how much your body lost from atrophy and neglect.

Learning, like exercise, is a never ending process.  Not only does our brain need the engagement and challenge to stay sharp, but there is always more to learn.  The body of information in our world is rapidly increasing.  Even learning all that is known today would take more than a lifetime.

In addition, the capabilities and comprehension of brains change over time. Experience shapes our view point and opens us up to a different analysis of the facts we know.   Learning expands our minds for new ideas.  New information leads to new discoveries.  Our world would stagnate if no one continued to learn beyond the basics.

The practice of endless learning is not new, it has been the backbone of human innovation since the dawn of time.  Those who keep researching, wondering, growing, and trying are the historical figures who have shaped our world. However, in this age of information, the wealth of knowledge and data is staggering.

Each day 2.5 extabytes (which is one billion billion bytes) are produced. Not all of this is relevant, neither is a large chunk of it true.  However, there it is, our lives are inundated with massive amounts of information.  Continual learning and study gives each of us the tools to wade through the false information, misinformation, and useless clutter to discern what is important.  In this way, we can make informed decisions and continue to grow in understanding, not get pulled down a stream of lie.

 

Lifelong learning matters because as “One Planet, One People” there is a never ending process of bettering this world for all who live here.  The more you know, the more you grow.  Let’s keep learning and create a brighter tomorrow.

 

How do you keep learning?  Why is lifelong learning important to you?

 

 

 

Coding for Math

Technology in Education

Tool or Hindrance?

 

It seems that everywhere I look, I see kids with technology. Like many, I have had mixed feelings about this increased presence in the hands of younger and younger children. I paid for my own cell phone as a teen and young adult, but my child has one as part of her every day tools. Granted, she is an avid reader and I have found that the gas and book money I save by being able to check out books and download them to a cell phone covers the cost of the plan she has. It is still a huge difference from when I was young.

Recently, I watched a video on Facebook that equated technology usage to cocaine for children. That is a jarring comparison, especially coming from the After School Special and DARE generation. It caused me to question if there is a way to find harmony between Technology and my children. Can technology be a helpful tool without the harmful effects?

Math and Programming?

 

In my search, I came across a blog by Jonathan Mugan a researcher and author. You can read it here. In his post, Dr. Mugan walks parents and educators through a “how to” in order to use programming to teach our children Math. It seems like fun to me, and I am not all that interested in programming! Disclaimer: This is probably because I LOVE to learn.

This fantastic blog post walks the educator through using Python and how to effectively teach basic arithmetic on up to PEMDAS and Variables. I can see where this could be useful for many kids! It is also an excellent example of technology being used effectively to teach.

 

Back to my child…

 

We had a rough school year and Math was often a struggle. Do you remember the Summer Slide post? This can also be an effective tool in a parent’s arsenal to combat it! I can’t wait to set this up for my mini me to work through. It will break up the usage of the Kahn Academy, which we are on daily and also will provide a new skill. Who knows, could this spark a “First Moment of Lasting Excitement?” Will a new path to software programmer begin?

 

In reality, anything that I can use as a tool to educate could also be abused and turned into a problem. As Dr. Mugan shows with his blog post, Technology can absolutely help with education. In fact, programming to learn Math is Innovative and could be Transformative for many. This could be a child’s “AHA Moment”.

 

So, go check out the blog post and maybe take some time to learn how to program! Consider joining our voyage if you have not already!