Why One Planet, One People

Why is our theme One Planet, One People?  The answer is simple yet very complex.  We are all on the same journey around the sun each day.  As the planet spins beneath our feet, our lives continue in regular rhythms that are so alike, despite our appeared differences.

 

Learning is the tie that binds us together, to our past and to our future.  Lessons that will ensure survival, break down walls, and build up rubble.  Our understanding of history, as well as science, and math, is essential to fixing all the problems that plague our modern society.

 

The ability to effectively communicate and problem solve, born of a good education that is rooted in quality literature, creative thinking, innovative exploration, and the arts, both practical and fine, is the mortar that will bridge the gap over what divides us.  Through a pursuit of lifelong education, we each contribute to making changes for the positive on this planet of ours.

 

One Planet, One People is not just our motto, it is our reality.  Do you want to see a better tomorrow?  Invest in understanding the “why” of our present age and then innovate a “how” to fix it.  We all share a common history and the unifying desire to make a difference. Help us expand this desire, your participation and presentations are an integral part of our mission.

 

One Planet, One People is a double sided call to action.  It first asks you to consider what you must study to open your own mind to possibilities, not yet thought, to improve our blue home. Secondly, it begs you to reach beyond your own little world and unite, to greater understand your neighbor, and to carry the torch of freedom born of knowledge to the far corners of the world.

 

This is the mission of Global Learn Day, to reach and to teach.  Not just on October 7th, but every trip around the sun.  It is our hope that this voyage will inspire every passenger to dive deeper into his own self improvement and help the tide to rise all ships that all may get to learn. Join us for our voyage!

What do you think when you are One Planet, One People?

 

Guided Education

Do you remember the last conversation that engaged you? Perhaps it sparked an interest that caused you to continue searching for information when you sat back down in front of your computer or visited your local library. What was the topic? Why did you become so engaged?

 

Global Learn Day seeks to engage all people by uniting them in a love for education and learning. In order to do this effectively we, the Crew, search far and wide for engaging information leading up to our event and presenters for the day of our event. We ask you, our voyagers, to help us by recommending individuals who share our desire to use education to help us achieve the idea of “One People, One Planet”.

 

This is an opportunity for all to participate and many to have a voice. Our most notable Key Note Speaker was Nelson Mandela, many years ago. You can still listen to his address here. Along with the audio, we have made his words available to read for those who need visual assistance to receive his message. Global Learn Day depends on educators and students to share their voices in order to present a valuable experience for all of our voyagers. If you, or someone you know, should be participating and presenting at Global Learn Day, you can find more information and our application here at our Call for Presenters.

 

If you would like to participate in any way for Global Learn Day please contact us and/or Join the Voyage!

Hibb’s Observations on the America Cup

As promised, John Hibb’s observations of the 2017 America’s Cup.

The Kiwis Rode in on a Bike. And Flew Out with the Cup.

We haven’t seen a thrashing this bad since Cassius Clay whupped Sony Liston. Clay, a heavy underdog, showed the power of foot speed, courage and that he could take a hit. All made more impressive by youth, innovation and ability to adjust to tough new challenges..

Plus, a terrific reminder of how the Wright Brothers whupped a race horse and left the horse in the dust.

But first….about the America’s Cup.

There is nothing bigger in whole entire sailing world than which TEAM takes home the Cup. (Entry fees, to begin, start at around $30 million bucks.) But who cares about the price?

Here, the difference was clear cut:

The boys from New Zealand were quick, dazzeling and superb. The opposition — Larry Ellison, founder of Oracle – got an old fashioned ass kicking. Particularly appropriate because Ellison dictated the design rules and set Bermuda as the venue.

What he didn’t count on was Kiwi Magic…a carryover from the days of “Black Magic”.

No matter. This was not about magic. In the end, Oracle was out-classed, out-manned, out-gunned by smart folks from Down Under.

In my book the Kiwis had it all the way.

Guess what? Big League sailboat racing will never be the same. In ten knots of breeze these machines are jaw-dropping rocket ships — with electronic wizardry that would amaze Google, Amazon and the whole geek world.. (Not to mention all those brainiacs at Oracle.)

But the biggest change came when the Kiwis substituted ordinary ‘coffee grinders’ for athletes recruited from the Tour de France. The message: Screw you Larry. We have a better way!

Today, the question that Ellison has yet to answer is a why billionaire software guru forgot this maxim: Sailors win races by a keen view of the seascape. What better view than high on a bicycle seat? Sure. Leg power is more powerful than arm power. But, far more important is that teamwork and collaboration is the heart of all great performances. Larry: Ask your grinders. Which team had the better collaborative platform? A better view of the whole entire race course?

Also this: While the America’s Cup vocabulary has changed from jib, spinnaker and mainsail to dagger boards, wings and foils….and “Fly Time” has become the most important new metric, the new dictum is you are either ‘up on your foil’ …..or you are looking at the tail end of a rocket ship.

Don’t blink! In a heart beat you could miss the knock out.

The simple truth is this: Foot speed really, really counts. Disagree? Ask anyone who saw Cassius Clay — (aka Muhammed Ali) — put a whuppin on Sonny Liston. For many of the same reasons, it was the same for the Kiwis.

Get To Know – John Hibbs

We recently asked our Global Learn Day Crew to answer a few questions. This was to help you, the individuals on this voyage with us, to get to know us better. First up is John Hibbs, one of the founders of Global Learn Day, who has been with us since our Maiden Voyage. Enjoy getting to know Mr. Hibbs and if you have questions for us, leave them in the comments!

What does Global Learn Day mean to you?

An attempt to increase affordable education to everyone, everywhere. Call it the “Earth Day”of Education.

How did you get involved in GLD?

I outreached to innovative and energetic souls like Dr. Terry Redding. I was lucky and found a half dozen people with such skills and such interest…(In the Redding case, the “bonus” was the skill sets of Redding Family members who could create videos of a kind that are on display here.)

What is your favorite thing to learn?

Lately, the remarkable changes made in the racing sailing world — namely the America’s Cup. (Stay tuned for Mr. Hibb’s latest observations!)

Who was an important teacher in your life?

My parents. Jesuit priests in grammar school. A couple of college professors.

How did you become a life long learner?

I’m not sure I have.

What was the moment you realized you were a life long learner?

Frankly, I haven’t reached that moment.

What is your current learning obsession?

Access and assessment.

Who or what is your learning inspiration?

The game of bridge.

What is your favorite book?

The Clock of the Long Now by Stuart Brand.

Where do you look for new things to learn?

Everywhere. Just open your eyes. Drones fascinate me. The drones used in the America’s Cup were key to the Kiwi victory.

What is something fun about yourself?

I’m a Duck from the University of Oregon and I live just a few blocks from the University.

Stay tuned for our next interview!

Book with Reading

Literature and Learning

Literature and You, Perfect Together

Have you read a good book lately?  Literature is one of the hallmarks of a developed culture.  It synthesizes the values, beliefs, and societal make up of time and era.  Even books that aren’t explicitly historical fiction present a commentary of the lives and times the author experienced.

 

Andrew Pudewa, education advocate and founder of the Institute for Excellence in Writing, observes that like anything you can’t get out what you don’t put in.  Our brains are like computer processors, they need the reliable connectors and high quality coding to produce good results.

 

Reading opens door and worlds to children and adults. Through books we can explore times and regions that would be impossible for us to access otherwise.  Reading truly is fundamental as the old commercial jingle said.  It is the building block of our civilization and our future innovations. In his book, How Literature Plays with the Brain, Paul B. Armstrong observes, “Literature matters, for what it reveals about human experience, and the very different perspective of neuroscience on how the brain works is part of that story.”

 

Books Are the Way of the Future

With all the technological advances, it is easy to focus on the STEM curriculum in the hopes of raising up a generation prepared and enthusiastic about all that is possible in this high tech world.  However, it is important to have roots before we have wings.  Literature can give us those roots and the brain power to soar.

 

Science has shown that reading actually stimulates the brain in a way that it actually believes it is doing something that it is not. This is called embodied cognition.  This same principle is employed by athletes who use visualization as a manner to enhance their skills.  When a basketball player uses visualization, it triggers the same centers of the brain used to physically play the game.  In this way, embodied cognition truly takes our brain to the place and time of what we are reading, allowing us to experience and problem solve on a high plane that watching the same story on television.

 

Literature also teaches empathy and understanding of other points of view.  Theory of Mind is “the branch of cognitive science that investigates how we ascribe mental states to other persons and how we use the states to explain and predict the actions of those other persons.”  Studies have shown that children who have more literature read to them have keener theory of mind and are better able to empathize with others.

 

While reading is the important part, it also matters what we read.  As stated above, you only get out what you put in.  Informational reading is not the same as deep reading of literature. The reading of complex literature with the drama, suspense, and intricate details creates life like images in our brains that exercise our brain and expand our ability to think.  Decoding words is not enough, we need to be reading literature that pulls us into the story.

 

Falling In Love Is Literature

In a Time magazine article about the value of reading literature, it states, “The deep reader, protected from distractions and attuned to the nuances of language, enters a state that psychologist Victor Nell, in a study of the psychology of pleasure reading, likens to a hypnotic trance. Nell found that when readers are enjoying the experience the most, the pace of their reading actually slows. The combination of fast, fluent decoding of words and slow, unhurried progress on the page gives deep readers time to enrich their reading with reflection, analysis, and their own memories and opinions. It gives them time to establish an intimate relationship with the author, the two of them engaged in an extended and ardent conversation like people falling in love.”

 

How romantic is that?  Books are not only our escapes but the gym for our minds.  As we teach children to love learning we must also instill a love of fine literature to fill their minds with rich language and shape their theory of mind for the benefit of the world at large.  As One Planet, One People; providing the access to quality literature books to all children can go a long way toward building the bridges to a future of peace and harmony.

 

What has literature done for you? What piece of literature have you loved?

Coding for Math

Technology in Education

Tool or Hindrance?

 

It seems that everywhere I look, I see kids with technology. Like many, I have had mixed feelings about this increased presence in the hands of younger and younger children. I paid for my own cell phone as a teen and young adult, but my child has one as part of her every day tools. Granted, she is an avid reader and I have found that the gas and book money I save by being able to check out books and download them to a cell phone covers the cost of the plan she has. It is still a huge difference from when I was young.

Recently, I watched a video on Facebook that equated technology usage to cocaine for children. That is a jarring comparison, especially coming from the After School Special and DARE generation. It caused me to question if there is a way to find harmony between Technology and my children. Can technology be a helpful tool without the harmful effects?

Math and Programming?

 

In my search, I came across a blog by Jonathan Mugan a researcher and author. You can read it here. In his post, Dr. Mugan walks parents and educators through a “how to” in order to use programming to teach our children Math. It seems like fun to me, and I am not all that interested in programming! Disclaimer: This is probably because I LOVE to learn.

This fantastic blog post walks the educator through using Python and how to effectively teach basic arithmetic on up to PEMDAS and Variables. I can see where this could be useful for many kids! It is also an excellent example of technology being used effectively to teach.

 

Back to my child…

 

We had a rough school year and Math was often a struggle. Do you remember the Summer Slide post? This can also be an effective tool in a parent’s arsenal to combat it! I can’t wait to set this up for my mini me to work through. It will break up the usage of the Kahn Academy, which we are on daily and also will provide a new skill. Who knows, could this spark a “First Moment of Lasting Excitement?” Will a new path to software programmer begin?

 

In reality, anything that I can use as a tool to educate could also be abused and turned into a problem. As Dr. Mugan shows with his blog post, Technology can absolutely help with education. In fact, programming to learn Math is Innovative and could be Transformative for many. This could be a child’s “AHA Moment”.

 

So, go check out the blog post and maybe take some time to learn how to program! Consider joining our voyage if you have not already!

Why Global Learn Day?

An excerpt of a paper from an Early GLD’er… Terrence R. Redding, PhD

Success, as a concept has been addressed at the personal, family, community, national and global level. Global Learn Day concerns success for all of mankind and in particular recognizes the potential worth of all persons. Global Learn Day does this through the narrow lens of learning.  In particular, we seek to recognize the importance of the acquisition of knowledge by circling the globe calling attention to and providing a platform for those with something interesting to say about learning.

Who will succeed in the Information Age?

What will be the difference between those who succeed and those who fail? On both a personal and a national level the difference may be as having to primary components.  The first is access, which is increasingly stated in terms of access to the Internet.  The second may be proudly classified as opportunity. Does an individual’s personal circumstances allow them to pursue knowledge, learn and improve themselves.  Many who have presented in the past and celebrated a Global Learn Day have focused on ways to increase access, or ways to provide greater opportunity to individuals to engage in learning. I would argue that embracing Global Learn Day is a way to focus on those two points, but additionally it is a way to set aside differences and come together as a planet and as one people to seek ways to insure each individual’s talent and genius can be engaged in extending mankind through learning.

It may well be that a combination of access to education, a valuing of self-directedness, and chance will produce those few individuals that will be most adept at guiding their societies through the transition into the Information Age. Just as certain countries are by-passing a copper based infrastructure for their communications needs and moving to micro-wave towers, still others are moving to fiber optics, while still others to satellite based communications — and still others to a combination of all three. — These are nations embracing the importance of education to the point where, in some cases, they pay their brightest to attend school and base access to education on emerging technologies associated with distance education over the Internet.

Online education has fewer barriers and presents wider access to potential student populations than do traditional schools. Students who require special accommodations in a traditional setting (and who therefore may be at a disadvantage) may not be at a disadvantage online. Whether that disadvantage is age, sight, height, mobility, speech, hearing, or whatever, these disadvantages often disappear online.

I am reminded of the commercial for the United Negro College Fund that concludes with the sentiment that “a mind is a terrible thing to waste.” How many minds will be educated at a distance that might not other wise be educated at all? And what of the contributions those minds will make to the human race?

Eight years ago, I had a chance to make a presentation at an educational conference that focused on a Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX) that I had conducted for 3,000 children in 21 schools in seven cities in Southwest Oklahoma. I was pretty proud of myself. I had involved a large number of children in a program that ultimately led to a group of students speaking live to the astronauts in the Shuttle as they orbited the earth. The entire exchange was broadcast on educational television.

A NASA scientist followed me. He described the development of a special wheelchair for Stephen Hawkins, a scientist suffering from Lou Gehrigs Disease, who could neither walk nor speak. This wheelchair provided Hawkins with access to the Internet and thus the rest of the world, to include libraries and the ability to write manuscripts and generate artificial speech. A few months ago, I saw a presentation by Hawkins, from his wheel chair, using the artificial speech from the synthesizer in his chair-mounted notebook computer. He described being able to access the various research telescopes of the world via the Internet. His topic was the most recent discoveries by the Hubble Space Telescope and the implications for theoretical astrophysics and mankind’s understanding of the universe.

Eight years ago there were few that considered the implications of the Internet as a distance education tool. I was not among them. Today, I still believe my SAREX was a significant contribution in the field of education. However, I believe the Hawkins’ wheelchair to be the more significant contribution because it allowed one of the great minds of our generation access to knowledge and the ability to share his understanding with millions if not billions of his fellow human beings. While I, with my SAREX, touched the minds of a mere 3,000.

I would compare Hawkins’ wheelchair to the Internet for the globe, with one note: where the wheelchair was wired for just one man, I would compare the value of the Internet to the value of a billion human minds online, to the thought that a single mind is a terrible thing to waste. Access to distance education via the Internet will empower potentially billions of people.

 

What tools can we use to expand our knowledge? Are we accessing education in every way possible? Are we making sure our children have as many access points as possible?

In the beginning there was Global Learn Day 1997

Looking Back at an Initial Impression

Access to Education: Global Learn Day

By Terrence R. Redding, Ph.D.

OnLine Training, Inc.

(Note – This was Dr. Redding’s initial reaction to Global Learn Day, almost twenty years ago. The GLD crew felt that it was still relevant today.)

No learning environment is ideal for all potential participants. Some individuals will find they are at a distinct disadvantage in one environment, while in another their disadvantages may disappear. Access for some may be restricted to distance education via the Internet. Online education is viewed by many as second rate (Hibbs, 1998). Why? The instructor and the student do not have face-to-face communications.

A year ago I would have agreed that online education is restricted by the lack of physical proximity. But that was before Global Learn Day 1 (GLD1), my first experience in a distance education online conference. I could hear speakers clearly via streaming RealAudio. I viewed PowerPoint presentation slides directly on my computer screen. I exchanged ideas with other participants and presenters in the Java Chat room. And I posed questions to the presenters through a moderator. In some cases I was also able to see presenters by using streaming video. I came to prefer the online conference over physical attendance. I had a more comfortable seat, could hear and see the content better, and actually had more access to presenters and participants. I missed the social interaction, but I was also not distracted by it. In 30 hours I went around the world hearing from some of the brightest and most innovative distance educators working today, all from the comfort of my home using a computer fresh out of the box with just a dialup connection to the Internet.

Internet technology does not yet convert the sensations of touch and smell to bandwidth, but in many ways Internet technology is far superior for some types of educational forums. I know that courses delivered via the Internet are often devalued as second-rate by traditional faculty and by the public who may view distance education as a poor second choice to attending class on campus. But I believe that within ten years, courses without a distant education (DE) components will be considered second rate.

Distance education via the Internet is not restricted to conferences. The company I am associated with, OnLine Training, Inc. (OLT), delivers educational content exclusively through online technology over the Internet to individuals in need of basic education or continuing professional education. Our students do not conform to the standard notions associated with age, grade, or development. For example, OLT has been developing and marketing a basic adult education program for the General Educational Development (GED) market. Our enrollment profile shows almost equal distribution among US students pursuing a GED, students overseas who need to pass the GED in order to qualify for college in the US, and young students ranging from those with learning disabilities to those who are “gifted”. Some are home schooled; others pursue online courses while attending public or private schools. If you open the door to education, and minimize the gate keeping, it is difficult to predict where the demand will be.

This past month I had an opportunity to speak to a graduate class of Human Resource Development (HRD) students at Florida Atlantic University. As we explored the pros and cons of distance education, I started thinking about some of the GED students with learning disabilities at OLT. One in particular, a young fellow of 15, came to mind. This lad’s speech is difficult to follow, with extended pauses between phrases. My guess is that in a traditional classroom he would not do well. He communicates too slowly to interact effectively with other students. Online he can take as long as he needs to put his thoughts in writing.

Online educational education has fewer barriers and presents wider access to potential student populations than do traditional schools. Students who require special accommodations in a traditional setting (and who therefore may be at a disadvantage) may not be at a disadvantage online. Whether that disadvantage is age, sight, height, mobility, speech, hearing, or whatever, these disadvantages often disappear online.

I am reminded of the commercial for the United Negro College Fund that concludes with the sentiment that “a mind is a terrible thing to waste.” How many minds will be educated at a distance that might not other wise be educated at all? And what of the contributions those minds will make to the human race?

Eight years ago I had a chance to make a presentation at an educational conference that focused on a Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX) that I had conducted for 3,000 children in 21 schools in seven cities in Southwest Oklahoma. I was pretty proud of myself. I had involved a large number of children in a program that ultimately led to a group of students speaking live to the astronauts in the Shuttle as they orbited the earth. The entire exchange was broadcast on educational television.

A NASA scientist followed me. He described the development of a special wheelchair for Stephen Hawkins, a scientist suffering from Lou Gehrigs Disease, who could neither walk nor speak. This wheelchair provided Hawkins with access to the Internet and thus the rest of the world, to include libraries and the ability to write manuscripts and generate artificial speech. Last week I saw a presentation by Hawkins, from his wheel chair, using the artificial speech from the synthesizer in his chair-mounted notebook computer. He described being able to access the various research telescopes of the world via the Internet. His topic was the most recent discoveries by the Hubble Space Telescope and the implications for theoretical astrophysics and mankind’s understanding of the universe.

Eight years ago there were few that considered the implications of the internet as a distance education tool. I was not among them. Today, I still believe my SAREX was a significant contribution in the field of education. However, I believe the Hawkins’ wheelchair to be the more significant contribution because it allowed one of the great minds of our generation access to knowledge and the ability to share his understanding with millions if not billions of his fellow human beings. While I, with my SAREX, touched the minds of a mere 3,000.

I would compare Hawkins’ wheelchair to the internet for the globe, with one note: where the wheelchair was wired for just one man, I would compare the value of the internet to the value of a billion human minds online, to the thought that a single mind is a terrible thing to waste. Access to distance education via the internet will empower potentially billions of human minds.

Formal education requires a firm foundation: a frame of reference, theory, concept, and structure. However, none of these things are static. They, and our understanding of them, change over time. The pace at which they are changing is increasing. The internet is providing a means by which these structures can be discussed and understood on a global scale. Toffler (1970 and 1980) in his two volume set discusses the implications of “Future Shock” and “The Third Wave” for mankind. There are those who are over whelmed by the pace of change; who suffer from Future Shock. And, there are those who appear to thrive on change; who may be the Third Wave. Those on the internet, and especially those educated on the internet may well be Third Wave people. No one can predict the outcome of the advent of the internet as a distance education medium or the potential power it will unleash in mankind as a learning animal. But I believe its impact will be more profound then the advent of the printing press.

Our task as educators is to ensure that as many people as possible have access to the mind-expanding power of the Internet. The date for Global Learn Day 2 (GLD2) is rapidly approaching. It occurs Columbus Day weekend and begins with the rising sun in Guam, and, proceeding for nearly 30 hours around the globe, ends with the setting of the sun in Hawaii. Whether you are interested in distance education for yourself or an organization consider taking the opportunity to experience it first hand during GLD2. I know of no better way to celebrate mankind’s natural continuing conquest of knowledge than to encourage people to celebrate learning through the interconnection of the planet during Global Learn Day.

END.

Today, OLT offers Business Development, Continuing Professional Education and Personal Development Courses both with partner institutions and direct to the student. They do this by partnering with Subject Matter Experts and creating courses in house. If you are interested in a partnership opportunity, contact them!

Consider joining #GLD2017! Contact us to become a Presenter!

Author – Simon Winchester

The best book I’ve read in the last six month — or six years? – is easily Atlantic, by Simon Winchester.

Simon’s also a great story teller, a very nice man who reminds me of the quip made by JFK at a White House Gala where every living American Nobel Prize winner was being hosed by the President.  Kennedy’s quip went like this:  “This is the brightest set of luminaries ever to dine together at one time in the White House…with the possible exception of when Thomas Jefferson dined alone.Continue reading “Author – Simon Winchester”

Authors – The New Digital Age

The (just released) book “The New Digital Age” is worth every dime!

One of the authors is Eric Schmidt, Executive Chairman of Google. (As high as you can get on my Wish List!)

Schmidt partnered up with Jared Cohen, a foreign policy counterterrorist specialist poached from the State Department now working for Google …. Director of Google Ideas & Adjunct  and Senior Fellow at CFR

Obviously, it will take some pretty tasty bait to get these guys on board. Wish me luck.